Skip to main content

NATO LIBRARY HOMEPAGE | NATO LIBGUIDES | CATALOG | MY ACCOUNT

NATO Multimedia Library: Journal Titles: P - W

RECENTLY RECEIVED JOURNAL ISSUES

P - W

Journal Titles: REGIONAL AND FEDERAL STUDIES --- WORLD POLITICS

Go to List of all journal titles

1

Regional and Federal Studies
Volume 27, no. 1, January 2017

Record

Results

1.

Macro-regional strategies of the European Union (EU) and experimentalist design of multi-level governance: the case of the EU strategy for the Danube region by Gänzle, Stefan. Regional & Federal Studies, January 2017, Vol. 27 Issue: Number 1 p1-22, 22p; Abstract: ABSTRACTPlaced within EU Cohesion policy and its objective of European territorial cooperation, macro-regional strategies of the European Union (EU) aim to improve functional cooperation and coherence across policy sectors at different levels of governance, involving both member and partner states, as well as public and private actors from the subnational level and civil society in a given ‘macro-region’. In forging a ‘macro-regional’ approach, the EU commits to only using existing legislative frameworks, financial programmes and institutions. By applying the analytical lens of multi-level and experimentalist governance (EG), and using the EU Strategy for the Danube Region as a case, this article shows that ‘macro-regional’ actors have been activated at various scales and locked in a recursive process of EG. In order to make the macro-regional experiment sustainable, it will be important to ensure that monitoring and comparative review of implementation experience functions effectively and that partner countries, subnational authorities and civil societies have a voice in what is, by and large, an intergovernmental strategy.; (AN 41249115)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41249115&site=ehost-live

2.

Reforming the Swedish employment-related social security system: activation, administrative modernization and strengthening local autonomy by Mathias, Jorg. Regional & Federal Studies, January 2017, Vol. 27 Issue: Number 1 p23-39, 17p; Abstract: ABSTRACTThe Swedish system of social security has often been regarded as comprehensive and comprehensive and inclusive. During major reforms in the 1990s and 2000s, it has maintained its essential character as a popular and well-endowed provider of social security and stability. Employment-related benefits are generous in financial terms, but come with the need for recipients to remain actively engaged in the economic or educational field. However, Sweden’s geographical and demographic diversity made it necessary to increase the role of local authorities in implementing active labour market policies. This article tracks these developments since the mid-1990s, both with regard to changing the benefits system and with regard to changing local government involvement. It argues that backed by broad political support, the Swedish system has achieved the necessary modernization and adaptation to remain a viable alternative to more neo-liberal welfare retrenchment projects conducted in other European countries.; (AN 41249116)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41249116&site=ehost-live

3.

Is cross-border cooperation underpinned by an ethical code of values? A theoretical analysis by Nadalutti, Elisabetta. Regional & Federal Studies, January 2017, Vol. 27 Issue: Number 1 p41-62, 22p; Abstract: ABSTRACTIs there an ‘ethical code’ of values that underpins cross-border cooperation activities? By focusing on people as ‘agents’, the article argues that citizens and individuals in their integral development have been neglected so far when the development of cross-border spaces is scrutinized. This study aims to provide an alternative theoretical framework through which cross-border activities can be analysed and operationalized. This is done by synergically reading Benedict XVI’s ‘Caritas in Veritate’ and Sen’s ‘Development as Freedom’. It is suggested that the ethical dimension of cross-border cooperation activities needs to be scrutinized on the ground that cross-border spaces are neither ethically neutral, nor inherently inhuman and opposed to society. They are instead part and parcel of human activities and must be structured and governed in an ethical manner. It follows that ethical values are the means of cohesion in cross-border zones. Without including them in the analysis, real cohesion cannot be achieved.; (AN 41249117)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41249117&site=ehost-live

4.

Signing up to devolution: the prevalence of contract over governance in English devolution policy by Sandford, Mark. Regional & Federal Studies, January 2017, Vol. 27 Issue: Number 1 p63-82, 20p; Abstract: ABSTRACTInitial analyses of the ‘devolution deals’ that form the cornerstone of current efforts to devolve power within England assess the policy against conventional governance criteria: accountability, transparency, and the quality of governance systems. In fact, English devolution policy has little connection with territorial governance. Instead, it closely resembles a contractual process, with central government determining the terms on which it will outsource specified programmes and projects to local governments, complete with requirements for ‘business readiness’, implementation plans, evaluation requirements, and future joint working. Accountability, governance and even geography take second place to the aim of improving central policy outcomes via a contract-style relationship. This perspective is styled ‘post-territorial devolution’: it accounts more effectively for the shape of the policy so far than traditional governance perspectives, which are often laced with normative positions.; (AN 41249118)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41249118&site=ehost-live

5.

Sticking to the Union? Nationalism, inequality and political disaffection and the geography of Scotland’s 2014 independence referendum by Pattie, Charles; Johnston, Ron. Regional & Federal Studies, January 2017, Vol. 27 Issue: Number 1 p83-96, 14p; Abstract: ABSTRACTScotland’s 2014 Independence Referendum affords a rare opportunity to examine public support for the break-up of a long-established, stable democracy. Analyses of support for Scottish independence reveal that while issues of national identity loomed large in the vote, they were not the only factors involved. Questions around the economic and political direction of the state, and around uneven development, ideology and trust in established politicians also influenced voters’ decisions. Partisanship also mattered, as voters were more likely than not to follow the lead of their party in what had become a highly partisan contest. But some parties – especially Labour – saw large minorities of their supporters vote against the party’s line to support independence.; (AN 41249119)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41249119&site=ehost-live

6.

Theorizing decentralization: comparative evidence from subnational Switzerland by Erk, Jan. Regional & Federal Studies, January 2017, Vol. 27 Issue: Number 1 p97-99, 3p; (AN 41249120)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41249120&site=ehost-live

7.

States falling apart? Secessionist and autonomy movements in Europe by Anderson, Paul; Keil, Soeren. Regional & Federal Studies, January 2017, Vol. 27 Issue: Number 1 p99-101, 3p; (AN 41249121)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41249121&site=ehost-live

 

2

RUSI Journal
Volume 162, no. 1, January 2017

Record

Results

1.

Foreword by De Angelis, Emma. The RUSI Journal, January 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 1 p3-3, 1p; (AN 41651325)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651325&site=ehost-live

2.

Letters by Penning, Mike. The RUSI Journal, January 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 1 p4-4, 1p; (AN 41651330)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651330&site=ehost-live

3.

The Changing Character of War by Johnson, Rob. The RUSI Journal, January 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 1 p6-12, 7p; Abstract: Several fashionable fallacies affect current assessments of the character of conflict. It is always difficult to discern what changes will affect the strategic level, especially when attention is focused on particular wars and technological novelties. In this article, Rob Johnson argues that an honest appraisal of what is unchanging offers one route to that evaluation. Strategically, revisionist geopolitics, an electronic arms race between encryption and access, and a greater focus on protecting populations and national wealth are anticipated. After a period when the West could intervene across the globe at will, it appears that escalatory, existential threats are back, demanding a strategic solution.; (AN 41651326)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651326&site=ehost-live

4.

Designing Conceptual Failure in Warfare by Roberts, Peter. The RUSI Journal, January 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 1 p14-23, 10p; Abstract: In this examination of modern warfare doctrine and strategies, Peter Roberts argues that Western militaries are constrained by thirteenth-century theological philosophy and Napoleonic dogma, while their enemies have leapt ahead into the twenty-first century – not simply in technological terms, but in the very way they have reimagined warfare.; (AN 41651329)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651329&site=ehost-live

5.

Back to the Gap by Nordenman, Magnus. The RUSI Journal, January 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 1 p24-30, 7p; Abstract: A resurgent Russian navy is increasingly active in the North Atlantic and around the Greenland–Iceland–UK gap. Magnus Nordenman argues that an effective response will require investments in high-end maritime capabilities, along with deeper cooperation among the US, the UK, Norway and others.; (AN 41651327)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651327&site=ehost-live

6.

Hybrid Maritime Warfare by Schaub, Gary; Murphy, Martin; Hoffman, Frank G. The RUSI Journal, January 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 1 p32-40, 9p; Abstract: Russia’s use of hybrid warfare techniques has raised concerns about the security of the Baltic States. Gary Schaub, Jr, Martin Murphy and Frank G Hoffman recommend a series of measures to augment NATO’s Readiness Action Plan in the Baltic region, including increasing the breadth and depth of naval exercises, and improving maritime domain awareness through cooperative programmes. They also suggest unilateral and cooperative measures to develop a sound strategic communications strategy to counter Moscow’s information operations, reduce dependence on Russian energy supplies and build the resilience of critical undersea and maritime infrastructure. Finally, the article proposes that more attention be devoted to resolving unsettled maritime boundaries between Latvia and Lithuania, and between Denmark and Poland, to reduce the chance that these can be exploited to increase regional instability as part of a larger hybrid campaign.; (AN 41651328)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651328&site=ehost-live

7.

Hybrid Warfare or Gibridnaya Voyna? by Fridman, Ofer. The RUSI Journal, January 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 1 p42-49, 8p; Abstract: During the last decade, ‘hybrid warfare’ has become a much used yet controversial term in professional military and political discussions. Since the beginning of the Ukraine crisis in 2014 its Russian counterpart, gibridnaya voyna, has also become very popular in professional military and academic discourse in Russia. Ofer Fridman explores Russian conceptual and theoretical publications and political analyses, showing that the only common ground between the two terms is the name. A grasp of the essential conceptual differences is vital in understanding contemporary political-security discourses in the post-Soviet region.; (AN 41651334)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651334&site=ehost-live

8.

Defining Contemporary Russian Warfare by Seely, Robert. The RUSI Journal, January 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 1 p50-59, 10p; Abstract: In this article, Robert Seely offers a comprehensive assessment of what has become known as Russian ‘hybrid’ warfare. First, he asks whether ‘hybrid’ is the most appropriate term to use when studying contemporary Russian warfare. Second, he introduces a method of categorisation to help make sense of the considerable diversity of Russian tools of war. Finally, he suggests that contemporary Russian warfare is more than just war; it amounts to a reinvention of strategic art, where the tools of state power are integrated into a single whole.; (AN 41651332)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651332&site=ehost-live

9.

Managing Defence Acquisition Cost Growth by Bangert, David; Davies, Neil; Watson, Ryan. The RUSI Journal, January 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 1 p60-67, 8p; Abstract: AbstractThis article reviews the previous literature on the cost escalation of defence equipment and provides estimates for Royal Navy platforms over the past 55 years. David Bangert, Neil Davies and Ryan Watson examine the experience of other European states and previous unsuccessful attempts to address the problem in the UK and other European countries. They conclude that while the problem cannot be ignored, solutions will be painful.; (AN 41651331)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651331&site=ehost-live

10.

The Future of Crime Reporting by Cole, Jennifer; Stickings, Alexandra. The RUSI Journal, January 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 1 p68-78, 11p; Abstract: Digital communication leaves traces that can lead back to the person who initiated the communication or their location at the time. Jennifer Cole and Alexandra Stickings explore the challenges this brings for platforms that claim to offer anonymous crime reporting, and ask what can be done to assure members of the public that their identity can still be protected.; (AN 41651333)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651333&site=ehost-live

11.

The Siege of Jadotville: A Review by Lawson, Ewan. The RUSI Journal, January 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 1 p80-81, 2p; (AN 41651336)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651336&site=ehost-live

12.

The Trump Phenomenon and the Future of US Foreign Policy / Crouching Tiger: What China’s Militarism Means for the World by Hemmings, John. The RUSI Journal, January 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 1 p82-84, 3p; (AN 41651338)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651338&site=ehost-live

13.

The New Politics of Russia: Interpreting Change by Denton, Alicky. The RUSI Journal, January 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 1 p84-85, 2p; (AN 41651335)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651335&site=ehost-live

14.

Strategic Narratives, Public Opinion, and War: Winning Domestic Support for the Afghan War by Heuser, Beatrice. The RUSI Journal, January 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 1 p86-87, 2p; (AN 41651337)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651337&site=ehost-live

15.

Living on the Edge: Iran and the Practice of Nuclear Hedging by Varriale, Cristina. The RUSI Journal, January 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 1 p87-88, 2p; (AN 41651339)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651339&site=ehost-live

16.

From Liddell Hart to Joan Littlewood: Studies in British Military History by Holden Reid, Brian. The RUSI Journal, January 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 1 p88-89, 2p; (AN 41651341)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651341&site=ehost-live

17.

Lawrence of Arabia’s War: The Arabs, the British and the Remaking of the Middle East in WW1 by Reddy, Sneha. The RUSI Journal, January 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 1 p90-91, 2p; (AN 41651340)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651340&site=ehost-live

 

3

Security and Human Rights
Volume 26, no. 1, December 2015

Record

Results

1.

Foreword Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p1-2, 2p; (AN 38099559)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=38099559&site=ehost-live

2.

Key Issues of the German osceChairmanship 2016 Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p3-10, 8p; (AN 38099557)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=38099557&site=ehost-live

3.

What German Responsibility Means Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p11-24, 14p; (AN 38099574)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=38099574&site=ehost-live

4.

Russian Views of the osceand the 2016 German Chairmanship Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p25-32, 8p; (AN 38099562)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=38099562&site=ehost-live

5.

The United States and the osceafter the Ukraine Crisis Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p33-47, 15p; (AN 38099604)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=38099604&site=ehost-live

6.

Successful Small States in the osceand the German Chairmanship of 2016 Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p48-64, 17p; (AN 38099560)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=38099560&site=ehost-live

7.

How Can a Dialogue be Restarted with Russia? Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p65-68, 4p; (AN 38099600)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=38099600&site=ehost-live

8.

Human Rights in Times of Crisis Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p69-77, 9p; (AN 38099653)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=38099653&site=ehost-live

9.

Conventional Arms Control in Europe Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p78-87, 10p; (AN 38099601)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=38099601&site=ehost-live

10.

Ukraine, Protracted Conflicts and the osce Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p88-106, 19p; (AN 38099605)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=38099605&site=ehost-live

11.

Tearing Down Real and Cognitive Walls Preventing Osce Compassion For Human Security in South-Eastern Europe Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p107-116, 10p; (AN 38099602)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=38099602&site=ehost-live

12.

The osceNetwork of Think Tanks and Academic Institutions Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p117-121, 5p; (AN 38099663)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=38099663&site=ehost-live

 

4

Security Dialogue
Volume 48, no. 2, April 2017

Record

Results

1.

Humanitarian security in Jordan’s Azraq Camp by Hoffmann, Sophia. Security Dialogue, April 2017, Vol. 48 Issue: Number 2 p97-112, 16p; Abstract: Azraq, a new camp for Syrian refugees in the Jordanian desert, presents an unprecedented integration of humanitarian service delivery and harsh security measures. I argue that Azraq’s ‘innovative’ order can only be explained in reference to three security claims that international refugee aid answers to: the claim to secure Syrian refugees, the claim to secure the Jordanian state and the claim to secure aid workers. Implementing these claims entails contradictory practices, which should create dilemmas for humanitarian aid, yet in Azraq these practices merge with each other. This merging (or integration) is aided by the humanitarian sector’s eager embrace of hi-tech solutions, especially digital data management. The article contributes to the growing debate about how security is articulated in the humanitarian arena by placing this debate’s key findings into conversation within a richly researched study of Azraq’s ‘material assemblage’ (Hilhorst and Jansen, 2010; Meiches, 2015). Further, the article emphasizes the importance of the under-researched area of aid organizations’ own security management.; (AN 41661868)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41661868&site=ehost-live

2.

Securing the Anthropocene? International policy experiments in digital hacktivism: A case study of Jakarta by Chandler, David. Security Dialogue, April 2017, Vol. 48 Issue: Number 2 p113-130, 18p; Abstract: This article analyses security discourses that are beginning to self-consciously take on board the shift towards the Anthropocene. It first sets out the developing episteme of the Anthropocene, highlighting the limits of instrumentalist cause-and-effect approaches to security, which are increasingly becoming displaced by discursive framings of securing as a process generated through new forms of mediation and agency and capable of grasping interrelations in a fluid context. This approach is the methodology of hacking: creatively composing and repurposing already existing forms of agency. It elaborates on hacking as a set of experimental practices and imaginaries of securing the Anthropocene, using as a case study the field of digital policy activism with a focus on community empowerment through social-technical assemblages being developed and applied in ‘the City of the Anthropocene’: Jakarta, Indonesia. The article concludes that policy interventions today cannot readily be grasped in modernist frameworks of ‘problem solving’ but should be seen more in terms of evolving and adaptive ‘life hacks’.; (AN 41661865)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41661865&site=ehost-live

3.

Securities markets and political securitization: The case of the sovereign debt crisis in the Eurozone by Langenohl, Andreas. Security Dialogue, April 2017, Vol. 48 Issue: Number 2 p131-148, 18p; Abstract: What were the effects of securities markets’ dynamics on the issue of political securitization, in the sense of the Copenhagen School, in the context of the sovereign debt crisis in the European Monetary Union (EMU)? This article addresses that question in an attempt to bring together the theory of political securitization and the financial securitization of government bonds. In conceptual terms, the article argues that the intervention of securities markets into the securitization of the euro can be understood as a confrontation between two types of validity claims. Securitizing moves, and the response they elicit, together constitute symbolically a political collectivity; this provokes a struggle between the adequate representation of that collectivity and its security concerns. In contrast to this, market communications – in fact, price signals – neither invoke a political collectivity nor can they be semantically refuted. Because of this quality, market signals can amplify or weaken securitizing moves. In the case of the EMU sovereign debt crisis, market communications triggered a privileging of supranational securitizations while impairing national ones.; (AN 41661864)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41661864&site=ehost-live

4.

‘I am somewhat puzzled’: Questions, audiences and securitization in the proscription of terrorist organizations by Jarvis, Lee; Legrand, Tim. Security Dialogue, April 2017, Vol. 48 Issue: Number 2 p149-167, 19p; Abstract: A recent wave of scholarship has drawn attention to the need for further engagement with the role of ‘the audience’ in securitization ‘games’. This article contributes to this discussion both theoretically and empirically by exploring the types of question an audience may ask of a securitizing actor before a securitizing act meets with success or failure. To do this, it offers a discursive analysis of all 27 UK parliamentary debates on the extension of proscription powers to additional terrorist organizations between 2002 and 2014. We argue first that these debates are characterized by a wide range of questions relating to the timing, criteria, mechanics, consequences and exclusions of proscription; and second, that these questions function as demands upon the executive to variously justify, explain, clarify, elaborate and defend decisions to extend the UK’s list of designated groups. Taking these questions seriously, we suggest, therefore allows insight into a variety of ways in which audiences might participate in security politics that are not adequately captured by notions of consent or resistance, or success or failure. This has empirical and theoretical value for understanding proscription, parliamentary discourse and securitization alike.; (AN 41661867)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41661867&site=ehost-live

5.

Exit from war: The transformation of rebels into post-war power elites by Hensell, Stephan; Gerdes, Felix. Security Dialogue, April 2017, Vol. 48 Issue: Number 2 p168-184, 17p; Abstract: The reintegration of rebels after war is a key security challenge. This article analyses the post-war transformation of rebels as a process of joining the established political elite. The political careers of former rebels vary. While some rise to senior political positions, others fail to consolidate their power. Taking theoretical notions of Pierre Bourdieu as its point of departure, this article outlines the central role of social capital in the post-war political field, which allows for an analysis and explanation of differences in rebel inclusion and exclusion. The article argues that the political careers of rebels are dependent on the accumulation of vertical and horizontal social capital in elite–mass and intra-elite networks. Case studies of Liberia and Kosovo demonstrate the plausibility of our thesis and the fruitfulness of a Bourdieusian approach in studying the political transformation of armed groups. This article contributes to the debate on the post-war reintegration of rebels as well as to the debate on practice approaches in international relations and security studies.; (AN 41661866)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41661866&site=ehost-live

 

5

Security Studies
Volume 26, no. 2, April 2017

Record

Results

1.

Neorealism, Security Cooperation, and Europe's Relative Gains Dilemma by Simón, Luis. Security Studies, April 2017, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 2 p185-212, 28p; Abstract: ABSTRACTMost neorealists argue that relative decline constitutes a systemic incentive for European security cooperation. Although this claim is broadly accepted, I argue that the relationship between relative decline and European security cooperation is complicated by a number of factors. First, European calculations about relative decline bear both a global and a regional (that is, intra-European) component. If a European country is to effectively mitigate relative decline, cooperation is not sufficient. It is just as important that cooperation develops in a way that underscores that country's comparative strengths and minimizes its weaknesses. In this regard, European countries are often in direct competition with each other. Secondly, when Europeans are thinking about their relative power position, some countries matter more than others: a given European country may accept to incur a relative loss vis-à-vis another country (European or otherwise) but not others. These calculations are further complicated by issue linkage. Some countries may accept relative losses on some issues (for example, security) in exchange for gains on others (economic). This article examines how intra-European considerations of relative gains affect the way in which Europe's main powers seek to cope with relative decline and assesses how those considerations affect security cooperation in a European Union (EU) framework. In doing so, it aims to unpack the otherwise vague notions of relative decline and European security cooperation.; (AN 41441006)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41441006&site=ehost-live

2.

Mind the Gap: Civilian Protection and the Politics of Peace Operation Design by Everett, Andrea L.. Security Studies, April 2017, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 2 p213-248, 36p; Abstract: ABSTRACTProtecting civilians from conflict and atrocities has become a major focus of governments, the UN, and activists. Yet peace operations—the main policy instrument for directly shielding civilians from violence—vary widely in how well they are designed to do so. One much-maligned problem is a gap between a force's ambitions to protect civilians and its physical resources for doing so. Missions plagued by these ambitions–resources gaps gesture toward protecting civilians but are not designed to do so effectively. They can also worsen civilian suffering. This article explores the politics behind these gaps, focusing on the role of powerful states—especially major Western democracies—in creating and facilitating them. It argues that ambitions–resources gaps represent a form of organized hypocrisy that helps political leaders balance competing normative and material pressures to protect civilians while limiting costs and risks. Case studies of France's Operation Turquoise in Rwanda and US support for the African Union Mission in Sudan (AMIS) in Darfur support the argument.; (AN 41441004)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41441004&site=ehost-live

3.

Region, System, and Order: The Mughal Empire in Islamicate Asia by Pardesi, Manjeet S.. Security Studies, April 2017, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 2 p249-278, 30p; Abstract: ABSTRACTThis article introduces early modern Islamicate Asia (∼1500–1750) as an international system. Three theoretical insights emerge from an analysis of the international relations of the Mughal Empire, the system's largest polity/economy. First, hierarchies are not necessarily peaceful because the system's structural attributes—polarity, the presence/absence of regions, and the pattern of interunit relations—remain important causal factors. Second, asymmetric material capabilities do not imply unequal relationships because the initiation of state-making policies that others emulate enhances the structural power of the initiator. Finally, systemic stability is reinforced when the interaction of trade, finance, and military power affirm the system's economic and security orders. These findings have implications for the expansion of Europe, for the study of world history, and for the emerging world order.; (AN 41441005)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41441005&site=ehost-live

4.

The Strategic Logic of Credit Claiming: A New Theory for Anonymous Terrorist Attacks by Abrahms, Max; Conrad, Justin. Security Studies, April 2017, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 2 p279-304, 26p; Abstract: ABSTRACTIn theory, terrorism is a political communication strategy for groups to convey their grievances and the costs of ignoring them. In practice, though, terrorist groups take responsibility for just a small portion of their attacks. Rather than getting credit for the violence, terrorist leaders generally deny their operatives committed it. This theoretical and empirical disconnect may explain why scholars have ignored the subject of unclaimed attacks despite these being the norm. With a mixed-methods research design, our study helps to fill this lacuna by proposing and testing a new theory to help account for variation in which attacks are claimed.; (AN 41441008)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41441008&site=ehost-live

5.

Why They Leave: An Analysis of Terrorist Disengagement Events from Eighty-seven Autobiographical Accounts by Altier, Mary Beth; Leonard Boyle, Emma; Shortland, Neil D.; Horgan, John G.. Security Studies, April 2017, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 2 p305-332, 28p; Abstract: ABSTRACTA deeper understanding of terrorist disengagement offers important insights for policymakers and practitioners seeking to persuade individuals to leave these groups. Current research highlights the importance of certain “push” and “pull” factors in explaining disengagement. However, such studies tell us very little about the relative frequencies at which these hypothesized factors are associated with leaving in the terrorist population. Using data collected from eighty-seven autobiographical accounts, we find that push, rather than pull, factors are more commonly cited as playing a large role in individuals' disengagement decisions and that the experience of certain push factors increases the probability an individual will choose to leave. Importantly, disillusionment with the group's strategy or actions, disagreements with group leaders or members, dissatisfaction with one's day-to-day tasks, and burnout are more often reported as driving disengagement decisions than de-radicalization. Finally, our results suggest that ideological commitment may moderate one's susceptibility to pull factors.; (AN 41441007)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41441007&site=ehost-live

6.

Regime Instability, Leader's Affiliation, and Organizational Culture: Why Are Military Dictatorships More Likely to Initiate Militarized Interstate Disputes? An Empirical Analysis, 1975–2006 by Panel, Sophie. Security Studies, April 2017, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 2 p333-358, 26p; Abstract: ABSTRACTPrior studies find that military dictatorships display a high propensity to initiate militarized interstate disputes (MIDs). Yet, there is little agreement on which feature of military regimes can best explain this behavior. This article distinguishes between three potential causes: coup risk, the dictator's affiliation with the military, and the military's influence on politics. Using recent data on authoritarian regimes, I find that, whereas coup risk is a strong predictor of conflict initiation, the dictator's affiliation does not affect his foreign policy. Furthermore, I find tentative evidence that the military's influence on domestic politics has a negative effect on MID initiation. These findings thus challenge the view that military regimes' foreign policy is due to the military's organizational culture: the relationship between military regimes and dispute initiation seems to be due to factors that simply happen to add up in military autocracies but are essentially unrelated to regime type.; (AN 41441009)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41441009&site=ehost-live

 

6

Small Wars and Insurgencies
Volume 28, no. 2, March 2017

Record

Results

1.

The Awakening Movement: A Narrative-level Study of Mobilization by Newton, Allen. Small Wars and Insurgencies, March 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 2 p267-290, 24p; Abstract: AbstractThis essay analyzes the link between mobilization and tribalism that developed in the Anbar Awakening. The Anbar Awakening exposed the Anbari tribal structure as a deeply entrenched and complex network deployed to mobilize support and generate behavior that would achieve the most advantageous strategy and position in a fight against al-Qaeda. Although this description supports David Kilcullen’s tribal society model, the rules of the Awakening movement that restored the tribal network were hardly explored by counter-insurgents for value and opportunity. The essay therefore draws on narratives from Anbari sheikhs to analyze the properties of tribalism (culture, identity, and problem-solving) as a non-linear social network, and demonstrates a paradigm in which mobilization of Anbari tribesmen is a valid indicator of security. The link between mobilization and tribalism in the Anbar Awakening therefore strategically develops to intervene in social life and address security locally.; (AN 41563291)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563291&site=ehost-live

2.

Merits and Limits of Counter-ideological Work Against Terrorism: A Critical Appraisal by Abdullah, Walid Jumblatt. Small Wars and Insurgencies, March 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 2 p291-308, 18p; Abstract: AbstractCounter-ideological work is touted as crucial in combating terrorism. This article attempts to analyse the role of counter-ideology in dealing with a particular type of terrorism: Muslim jihadist extremism. This paper reiterates findings from existing research, in arguing that counter-ideology is indispensable for three reasons: firstly, to prevent Muslims from genuinely believing that terrorism is sanctioned by the faith; secondly, it is instructive to assure non-Muslims that Islam per se, is not the problem; and finally, it can be used to ‘rehabilitate’ terrorists who are in detention. However, this paper also suggests four criticisms of many counter-ideological efforts, and posit that in order for such work to be truly effective, the following shortcomings need to be rectified: firstly, the creation of unnecessary frontiers that may alienate potential allies; secondly, the inability to ‘preach to the right crowd’; thirdly, the perils of promoting ‘moderate’ and ‘progressive’ Islam; and finally, credibility issues associated with the people spearheading such works. An underlying factor that lurks in the background of all of these is the role of the ulama, or Islamic religious scholars. This article further hopes to contribute to the literature on counter-terrorism by exercising more scrutiny on the role of the ulama.; (AN 41563292)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563292&site=ehost-live

3.

An Unlikely Alliance: Portuguese and South African Airpower in Angola, 1968–1974 by Cann, John P.; Correia, José Manuel. Small Wars and Insurgencies, March 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 2 p309-336, 28p; Abstract: AbstractThe war that Portugal was obliged to fight in Africa began in 1961 and immediately stretched the resources of its armed forces. Nowhere was this thinness more apparent than in policing the vast territory of Angola. The east and southeast of Angola were particularly vulnerable, as the area was a vast, sparsely populated region characterised by enormous featureless plains or chanascovered in tall grass and broken by an extensive river system and mountainous forests. The only military solution to policing these immense spaces was aviation and specifically the helicopter that could carry troops into battle, protect them with a gunship and bring them home when the operation was concluded. The immediate problem for the Portuguese Air Force (Força Aérea Portuguesaor FAP) in Angola and elsewhere was a scarcity of helicopters. The solution was an alliance with South Africa, which had a strong inventory of Alouette IIIs, to help in policing the east. This move was likewise in the interest of South Africa, as its threat came from Zambia through south-eastern Angola. This article examines the strategic and tactical development of this unusual, cross-cultural alliance and the symbiotic relationship that resulted in destruction of the enemies of both in Angola.; (AN 41563296)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563296&site=ehost-live

4.

Governmental Re-organization in Counterinsurgency Context: Foreign Policy Program Transfer and Operation Switchback in South Vietnam by Strandquist, Jon. Small Wars and Insurgencies, March 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 2 p337-360, 24p; Abstract: AbstractForeign policy program transfer, the shifting of implementation responsibility for a foreign policy program from one organization to another, is a ubiquitous, yet under-studied, counterinsurgency phenomenon. This article conceptually develops program transfer as an important object of study; analyzes, using archival sources, an empirical case of program transfer, Operation Switchback, drawn from US counterinsurgency practice in South Vietnam; and formulates two preliminary theoretical claims related to program transfer: (1) transferred programs will tend to be altered in accordance with the characteristics of the gaining organization, and (2) program transfer may act as a signal or early-warning indicator of foreign policy change.; (AN 41563295)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563295&site=ehost-live

5.

‘A Sledgehammer to Crack a Nut’? Naval Gunfire Support During the Malayan Emergency by Paget, Steven. Small Wars and Insurgencies, March 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 2 p361-384, 24p; Abstract: AbstractThe utility of naval gunfire support (NGS) during the Malayan Emergency has been the subject of significant scrutiny. While the limitations of NGS were demonstrated in Malaya, it also has proven to be extremely useful under certain circumstances. The circumstances in which NGS has proven effective during earlier and later insurgencies have generally reflected those of the Malayan Emergency. Recent operations in Afghanistan and Iraq have been less conducive to the application of maritime power, but they did not denote the end of the naval role or the potential usefulness of NGS in counterinsurgency operations. NGS is an unheralded capability, but, aside from the historical significance, it remains relevant in the contemporary era under the right conditions.; (AN 41563297)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563297&site=ehost-live

6.

How might Democratisation Affect Military Professionalism in Africa? Reviewing the Literature by Robinson, Colin. Small Wars and Insurgencies, March 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 2 p385-400, 16p; Abstract: AbstractThe search continues for methods to improve security for development in Sub-Saharan Africa. One of the important actors in this security arena is Sub-Saharan African governments’ armies. Much of their capability to meet security challenge depends on how militarily professional they are. The wave of democratic evolution in Africa since 1990 also affected military professionalism. This article reviews three models for assessing how democratisation might affect military professionalism in Sub-Saharan Africa, with special attention to post-conflict states. This should make it possible to decide which analytical methods are most appropriate to measure military professionalism in the particular circumstances of Sub-Saharan African post-conflict democratisation. Depending upon the particular nation-state in question, this decision on analytical methods may be useful for other Sub-Saharan states as well.; (AN 41563294)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563294&site=ehost-live

7.

Collateral Damage: A Candid History of a Peculiar Form of Death; War and War Crimes: The Military, Legitimacy and Success in Armed Conflict by O’Driscoll, Cian. Small Wars and Insurgencies, March 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 2 p401-404, 4p; (AN 41563298)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563298&site=ehost-live

8.

Ionian Vision: Greece in Asia Minor by Schwonek, Matthew R.. Small Wars and Insurgencies, March 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 2 p404-405, 2p; (AN 41563299)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563299&site=ehost-live

9.

Notes on Contributors Small Wars and Insurgencies, March 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 2 p406-407, 2p; (AN 41563300)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563300&site=ehost-live

 

7

Southeast European and Black Sea Studies
Volume 17, no. 1, January 2017

Record

Results

1.

The rise of a hesitant EU host? Examining the Greek migrant integration policy and its transformation during the crisis by Mavrommatis, George. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, January 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 1 p1-15, 15p; Abstract: AbstractGreece lately, as a result of the crisis, has been transformed from a migrant receiving (host) country to a simultaneously migrant sending and receiving one. At the same time, processes of migrant de-integration from the economy and society have been manifesting too. This paper attempts to draw light on Greek migrant integration policy, which through the years has been characterized by a contradiction between policy narratives and concrete actions on the ground. More specifically, this paper brings to the fore a policy change that occurred during the period 2012–2015 and possibly continues up to now. According to this policy shift, special emphasis was put on the acquisition of the European long-term resident status from the part of already settled migrants as a passport to their intra-European mobility. Politically speaking, such developments were heralded as a win–win situation for both migrants, but also, Greece as a host country. Nevertheless, this rise of a hesitant EU host, who turned its integration policy into a managing migration endeavour, might be indicative of broader tendencies and trends within an expanded EU migratory landscape that includes both migration, but lately most importantly, asylum too.; (AN 41434056)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41434056&site=ehost-live

2.

Grammar, context and power: securitization of the 2010 Belgrade Pride Parade by Ejdus, Filip; Božović, Mina. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, January 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 1 p17-34, 18p; Abstract: AbstractIn the wake of the 2010 Belgrade Pride Parade, right-wing extremists portrayed the event as a threat to public morals, while liberals framed homophobia as a threat to democracy. While these moves managed to polarize and mobilize the public, the government didn’t heed their calls to adopt extraordinary measures. The Parade took place on 10 October and the extremists organized unchecked violent counter-demonstrations. By drawing on Securitization Theory, we triangulate content and discourse analysis to understand why these securitizing moves had a low success. Our analysis shows that although both moves followed the grammar of security, they were only partially embedded into the wider discursive context and were not enunciated by securitizing actors with strong positional power.; (AN 41434057)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41434057&site=ehost-live

3.

Determinants of young people’s civic and political participation in Turkey by Bee, Cristiano; Kaya, Ayhan. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, January 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 1 p35-39, 5p; Abstract: AbstractThis special section provides a timely reflection on current debates that are of extreme relevance in order to gain a better understanding of the concepts of citizenship and active citizenship in Turkey, by looking at the determinants of civic and political participation, at the patterns of political and civic mobilization and at the orientations of political behaviour. Its originality stands on the specific focus on young people in comparison to other age groups. The different papers remark upon the importance that the reframing of the notions of citizenship and active citizenship have in the Turkish context along with the determinants that make this remark more relevant than ever.; (AN 41434058)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41434058&site=ehost-live

4.

Youth welfare policy in Turkey in comparative perspective: a case of ‘Denied Youth Citizenship’ by Yılmaz, Volkan. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, January 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 1 p41-55, 15p; Abstract: AbstractThis article explores the main characteristics of social and economic policies for young people in Turkey. Inspired by Tom Chevalier’s typology of youth welfare citizenship designed for Western European countries, the article situates Turkey’s youth welfare citizenship model within a comparative perspective and contributes to the extension of Chevalier’s typology to a non-Western European country context. Relying upon the systematic analysis of findings of a nationwide survey on young people that was conducted in 2013, comparative youth statistics, official youth statistics, public expenditures data and existing policy frameworks, the article suggests that Turkey fits well with the denied youth citizenship type in Chevalier’s typology. Two conclusions are drawn with respect to Turkey’s youth welfare citizenship model. First, with respect to the social citizenship dimension, the article finds that social and youth policy structure in Turkey has a familialization effect on young people’s access to income. In terms of economic citizenship, the article suggests that Turkey implements a selective strategy that results in unequal distribution of labour market skills among young people.; (AN 41434060)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41434060&site=ehost-live

5.

Understanding young citizens’ political participation in Turkey: does ‘being young’ matter? by Erdoğan, Emre; Uyan-Semerci, Pınar. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, January 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 1 p57-75, 19p; Abstract: AbstractParticipation is key to the discussions of democracy and justice. For all citizens, no matter their differences, having the ability to participate is a difficult but required condition for a just and democratic political community. Based on the recent research on citizenship in Turkey, this article aims to explore, first, whether young citizens’ political participation shows a different pattern when compared to the rest of the population and, second, whether being young still determines the outcome when controlled for demographical factors and economic status. We then question whether belonging to different collective identities plays a different role in the way young citizens participate, and how. Last, mostly focusing on young citizens’ perceptions of the Gezi Park protests, the paper will discuss the role of politicized collective identities in the formation of conventional and unconventional political participation.; (AN 41434059)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41434059&site=ehost-live

6.

The political psychology of participation in Turkey: civic engagement, basic values, political sophistication and the young by Chrona, Stavroula; Capelos, Tereza. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, January 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 1 p77-95, 19p; Abstract: AbstractThis article aims to understand the recent heightened levels of mobilization and unconventional political participation in Turkey. We use a political psychology model that highlights the impact of civic engagement, political sophistication, and values on conventional and unconventional participation. We argue that these factors will be significant predictors of unconventional participation setting it apart from conventional political behaviour, which will be driven by simpler considerations. We expect these qualitative differences in the drivers of conventional and unconventional participation to go beyond age and gender differences and highlight the complexity of political decision-making in Turkey’s electoral authoritarian system. We use the 2012 World Value Survey to test our hypotheses, with a nationally representative sample of Turkish citizens. We find significant variations in the role of values, sophistication and levels of civic engagement for conventional and unconventional participation when controlling for age, gender and left–right ideological orientations. Our findings confirm the complex considerations that drive citizens’ engagement with politics and can be useful to explaining recent political developments in Turkey involving youth, public mobilization and protests, but also mainstream voting choices.; (AN 41434062)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41434062&site=ehost-live

7.

Youth participation in local politics: city councils and youth assemblies in Turkey by Gökçe-Kızılkaya, Suna; Onursal-Beşgül, Özge. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, January 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 1 p97-112, 16p; Abstract: AbstractThe focus of this study is political participation of youth in local politics in Turkey. Since local politics includes elements from both macro politics and mundane affairs, it proves to be a fertile ground to analyse how youth experience politics. Youth participation in local politics became an important issue in Turkey with the Agenda 21. The Agenda 21 that was launched with the UN Rio Summit was transferred to Turkey in the form of Local Agenda 21 leading to the establishment of city councils and youth assemblies under the umbrella of the councils. We treat city councils and youth assemblies as ‘a lost opportunity’ for now, and we ask why the youth cannot be integrated into local politics, despite the fact that they are willing to participate. Based on the interviews conducted with the members of assemblies, we try to understand the factors that lead to young people’s engagement in political life.; (AN 41434061)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41434061&site=ehost-live

8.

Rights and obligations in civil society organizations: learning active citizenship in Turkey by Çakmaklı, Didem. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, January 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 1 p113-127, 15p; Abstract: AbstractThis is a comparative analysis of whether and how participation in different types of civil society organizations (CSOs) enable an environment for the learning of active citizenship practices. Active citizenship is conceptualized and defined around three dimensions: civic action, social cohesion and self-actualization. The potential to transform citizenship practices is critical to the Turkish context where, rooted in its strong state tradition, citizenship has been conceptualized and practiced in a passive manner. CSOs in Turkey have burgeoned over the past two decades and provide an important space to pursue a wide range of interests and provide services. This study is an in depth analysis of participant experiences in six CSOs in Istanbul. The study distinguishes between CSOs based on indicators that are expected to create variation in how the participant is engaged. CSOs are classified as either rights or obligations based, membership or volunteer based, and finally based on their types of activities. This article presents results on the effect of participation in rightsvs. obligations-based CSOs on the development of active citizenship practices.; (AN 41434063)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41434063&site=ehost-live

9.

Youth and active citizenship in Turkey: engagement, participation and emancipation by Bee, Cristiano; Kaya, Ayhan. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, January 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 1 p129-143, 15p; Abstract: AbstractThis article critically discusses the establishment of active citizenship in Turkey with a specific focus on young people. In particular, we concentrate on the emergence of different strategies regarding civic and political participation in Turkey, by looking at their relationship with civic and political engagement. The scope is to focus on the influence that various factors have in determining patterns of participation. The research and relative results are based on the narratives inherent to two opposite scenarios – that we defined constraints to engagement and participationand patterns of emancipation– that emerged during the interviews with youth activists of NGOs in Turkey.; (AN 41434064)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41434064&site=ehost-live

10.

The Ottoman Empire and the Bosnian Uprising: Janissaries, modernisation and rebellion in the nineteenth century by Donia, Robert J.. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, January 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 1 p145-146, 2p; (AN 41434065)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41434065&site=ehost-live

11.

Turkey’s entente with Israel and Azerbaijan: state identity and security in the Middle East and Caucasus by Athanassopoulou, Ekavi. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, January 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 1 p146-148, 3p; (AN 41434080)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41434080&site=ehost-live

12.

Nations and citizens in Yugoslavia and the post-Yugoslav States – one hundred years of citizenship by Calori, Anna. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, January 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 1 p148-150, 3p; (AN 41434066)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41434066&site=ehost-live

13.

Economic crisis and civil society in Greece new forms of engagement & ‘deviations’ from the past by Frangonikolopoulos, Christos A.. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, January 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 1 p150-153, 4p; (AN 41434067)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41434067&site=ehost-live

 

8

Strategic Analysis
Volume 41, no. 1, January 2017

Record

Results

1.

Sub-Regionalism in South Asia: A Case Study of the Bangladesh–Bhutan–Nepal–India Motor Vehicles Agreement by Kumar, Vikash. Strategic Analysis, January 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 1 p1-13, 13p; Abstract: AbstractThis article has two parts. The first part aims at analysing why nations are increasingly going beyond their multilateral and regional moorings to secure and advance their national interests. In doing so, why and how do they indulge in sub-regional engagements? It has been empirically seen across the board in almost every part of the world that sub-regional growth initiatives play a significant role in regional integration. The second part, by drawing from the above broad conceptualization in South Asia, uses the Bangladesh–Bhutan–India–Nepal Motor Vehicles Agreement (BBIN MVA) as a case study.; (AN 40601237)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40601237&site=ehost-live

2.

US Security Strategy of Asian Rebalance: India’s Role and Concerns by Nautiyal, Annpurna. Strategic Analysis, January 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 1 p14-33, 20p; Abstract: AbstractChina’s aggressive rise and strained relations with its Asia-Pacific neighbours—a region with immense economic and strategic potential—have forced the US to forge a strategy of Asian rebalance. Besides making China suspicious, this strategy has aroused the possibility of a new cold war. In contrast, though India’s relations with China have improved considerably since the 1962 War, the unresolved border issue and the threatening Chinese attitude do not allow India to trust China. To deal with the Chinese threat, India has devised a Look East, Act East engagement policy as well as developed close economic and strategic relations with the US and its Asia-Pacific allies. Although the concern of strategic autonomy deters India from being an active partner of US strategy, China’s all-weather friendship with Pakistan and encirclement through infrastructure in its neighbourhood as well as Xi Jinping’s Chinese dream have left limited options for India. Therefore, this article aims to analyse the implications of US re-involvement in the Asia-Pacific and India’s role therein—particularly its concerns regarding this strategy.; (AN 40601240)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40601240&site=ehost-live

3.

Insurgency, Drugs and Small Arms in Myanmar by Behera, Anshuman. Strategic Analysis, January 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 1 p34-48, 15p; Abstract: AbstractThe many links between drugs, small arms and insurgency have been widely discussed and addressed by scholars. The literature in particular has convincingly shown how several insurgent groups in Myanmar have used the drug business to finance and sustain their violent movements. Funds generated from drug production and circulation help the insurgent groups to procure arms, and are widely believed to be supporting the protracted nature of these movements. In this context, Myanmar presents itself as a classic example wherein the relationship between drugs, small arms and insurgency becomes clearly apparent. The country has become a major hub for illicit drugs production. It has been observed that insurgency, arms smuggling and illicit drugs business depend heavily on each other for their sustenance. The ‘ungoverned territories’ bordering other states also help insurgencies and keep the drug business flourishing. Given this context, this article focuses on unravelling the linkages among insurgency, drugs and small arms in Myanmar.; (AN 40601243)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40601243&site=ehost-live

4.

Preventive Diplomacy and the Role of Civil Maritime Security Cooperation in Southeast Asia by Llewelyn, James D.. Strategic Analysis, January 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 1 p49-60, 12p; Abstract: AbstractSoutheast Asia’s international shipping lanes (ISL) are essential to the economic security of the Asia-Pacific region. Maintaining good order at sea serves to protect regional trade and can be achieved through collaboration between civil maritime security agencies (coast guards). Japan and China both have significant coast guard capabilities and diplomatic influence in the region that could be harnessed to promote civil maritime security cooperation with the countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). With regional tensions rising over disputed waters in Southeast Asia, ‘white hull diplomacy’ would seem to be a timely option for governments to consider in search of an intra-Asian de-escalation process.; (AN 40601238)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40601238&site=ehost-live

5.

Has Nigeria Defeated Boko Haram? An Appraisal of the Counter-Terrorism Approach under the Buhari Administration by Onapajo, Hakeem. Strategic Analysis, January 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 1 p61-73, 13p; Abstract: AbstractOne of the campaign promises of President Muhammadu Buhari was that he would eliminate Boko Haram six months after assumption of office. By December 2015, the Buhari-led government gave itself a pass mark for countering the terrorists. The government declared that the group had been ‘technically defeated’. This declaration has led to debates in the public space as to the veracity of this claim. This article aims to critically appraise the on-going attempt to eliminate the Boko Haram threat under the Buhari administration. The author questions whether we can actually conclude that the anti-Boko Haram war has really been won. The article analytically demonstrates that Boko Haram continues to pose a threat to Nigeria and the West African sub-region, contrary to claims that it has been defeated.; (AN 40601249)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40601249&site=ehost-live

6.

Subsystemic Unipolarities? Power Distribution and State Behaviour in South America and Southern Africa by Schenoni, Luis Leandro. Strategic Analysis, January 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 1 p74-86, 13p; Abstract: AbstractThis article explores the possibility of conceiving South America and Southern Africa as subsystemic unipolarities under Brazilian and South African primacy, respectively. It argues that this concept, when applied to these regions, sheds light not only on the long-term strategies behind the Brazilian and South African foreign policies towards their neighbourhood, but also on the behaviour of secondary regional powers and small states. This hypothesis questions the maxim that considerations related to polarity affect great powers only. After examining the Brazilian and South African cases, the author undertakes a comparative analysis of 17 countries in these regions, showing that the behaviour of politically stable countries in these regions is as predicted by theories of unipolarity.; (AN 40601246)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40601246&site=ehost-live

7.

What are India, Iran, and Afghanistan’s Benefits from the Chabahar Port Agreement? by Amirthan, Shawn. Strategic Analysis, January 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 1 p87-93, 7p; (AN 40601242)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40601242&site=ehost-live

8.

The Challenges and Opportunities of a Negotiated Settlement in Afghanistan by Dostyar, Aref. Strategic Analysis, January 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 1 p94-109, 16p; (AN 40601245)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40601245&site=ehost-live

9.

Brexit: Harbinger of an Unexpected New World Order by Jain, Sandhya. Strategic Analysis, January 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 1 p110-117, 8p; (AN 40601250)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40601250&site=ehost-live

10.

Unheeded hinterland: identity and sovereignty in northeast India, by Dillip Gogoi by Waterman, Alex. Strategic Analysis, January 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 1 p118-120, 3p; (AN 40601236)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40601236&site=ehost-live

11.

New south Asian security: six core relations underpinning regional security, by Chris Ogden by Bisht, Medha. Strategic Analysis, January 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 1 p121-123, 3p; (AN 40601239)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40601239&site=ehost-live

12.

Smart diplomacy: exploring China-India synergy, by P.S. Suryanarayana by Singh, Prashant Kumar. Strategic Analysis, January 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 1 p124-125, 2p; (AN 40601247)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40601247&site=ehost-live

13.

Acknowledgement of Referees Strategic Analysis, January 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 1 p126-129, 4p; (AN 40601248)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40601248&site=ehost-live

14.

Contributions Published in Strategic Analysisin 2016 Strategic Analysis, January 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 1 p130-137, 8p; (AN 40601244)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40601244&site=ehost-live

 

9

Studies in Conflict and Terrorism
Volume 40, no. 6, June 2017

Record

Results

1.

“What ISIS Really Wants” Revisited: Religion Matters in JihadistViolence, but How? by Cottee, Simon. Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, June 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 6 p439-454, 16p; Abstract: ABSTRACTIn his influential and provocative article on “What ISIS Really Wants,” published in The Atlanticin March 2015, Graeme Wood argued that “the Islamic state is Islamic. VeryIslamic.” He also sought to challenge what he diagnosed as a “western bias” among academics and policymakers toward religious ideology, whereby religious doctrines or beliefs are relegated to the status of epiphenomena rather than taken seriously as causal properties in their own right. Wood's article sparked a wider—and still ongoing—debate over the relationship between Islam and jihadistviolence. For one side in this debate, Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) is inexplicable without reference to Islamic scripture; indeed, some commentators and politicians have even argued that it represents the “true” face of Islam; for the other side, ISIS is a hideous distortion of Islam's “true” teachings, and is inexplicable without reference to the wider political circumstances in which it emerged and to which it is a response. This article attempts to forge a middle way between these two polarized viewpoints by arguing that any comprehensive account of ISIS must recognize both its secular and theological bases. More specifically, and drawing on the work of the intellectual historian Quentin Skinner, it argues that Wood's critics, in their understandable but misplaced eagerness to detach Islam from jihadistviolence, fail to accord proper causal weight to the legitimizing role of revolutionary Islamic ideas—and the innovating ideologists who develop these—in the commission of this violence.; (AN 41651148)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651148&site=ehost-live

2.

A Comparative Study of U.S. and Iranian Counter-ISIS Strategies by Esfandiary, Dina; Tabatabai, Ariane M.. Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, June 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 6 p455-469, 15p; Abstract: ABSTRACTThe Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS)'s activities now go beyond insurgency and conventional operations in the territories it controls in the Middle East. It poses a threat to U.S. interests and allies in Europe, and a serious threat to Iran and its borders. While Washington formed an international coalition encompassing many European and Middle Eastern states to combat ISIS, it only coordinates some tactical and operation-level efforts with a key player on the ground: Iran. For its part, Iran is leveraging similar counter-ISIS tools as those adopted by the United States, despite their strategies differing fundamentally.; (AN 41651147)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651147&site=ehost-live

3.

The Dynamics of Terrorism and Counterterrorism: Understanding the Domestic Security Dilemma by Field, Antony. Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, June 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 6 p470-483, 14p; Abstract: ABSTRACTThis article argues that the concept of the “domestic security dilemma” can help us to better understand public opposition to government counterterrorism policies. It examines the concept of the “security dilemma” in international relations theory and argues that this concept can also be applied to the analysis of domestic security politics. The article explains that when the government takes actions intended to make people safer from terrorist threats, it often has the unintended consequence of heightening concerns about government oppression. Thus, counterterrorism represents a “domestic security dilemma”—a situation where security tradeoffs have consistently undermined anticipated security gains.; (AN 41651149)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651149&site=ehost-live

4.

Does the International Trafficking of Cultural Heritage Really Fuel Military Conflicts? by Losson, Pierre. Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, June 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 6 p484-495, 12p; Abstract: ABSTRACTGeneral media outlets are increasingly arguing that the looting of cultural heritage artifacts contributes to the funding of terrorist groups such as Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). This article reexamines this claim in light of the political science literature on internal conflicts duration. While we do know that armed conflicts contribute to an increase of looting activities in the territories at war, it is still too early to generalize the ISIS case and conclude that these activities contribute to significantly funding armed non-state actors and to prolonging internal armed conflicts. However, establishing this link may add political weight to archeologists' and art historians' efforts to curb the international trafficking of looted objects.; (AN 41651150)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651150&site=ehost-live

5.

Coercive Radicalization: Charismatic Authority and the Internal Strategies of ISIS and the Lord's Resistance Army by Beevor, Eleanor. Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, June 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 6 p496-521, 26p; Abstract: ABSTRACTA framework for understanding Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS)'s apocalyptic theology as an internal strategy to “coercively radicalize” its captive subjects is presented, by comparison to the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), which shares key stages of captive indoctrination with ISIS. A violent experience of “entry,” religious rules learned in an “assimilation” process, and millenarian “grand narratives” framing violence as purification, are examined. These stages construct an image of group leaders as divinely endowed with spiritual knowledge and access (i.e., charismatic authority). This can create a sense of dependency on the leaders and their instructions, potentially motivating violent and altruistic behavior from initially unwilling subjects.; (AN 41651151)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41651151&site=ehost-live

 

10

Survival
Volume 59, no. 2, March 2017

Record

Results

1.

The Emperor vs the Adults: Donald Trump and Wilhelm II by Heisbourg, François. Survival, March 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 2 p7-12, 6p; Abstract: The analogy between the US president and German emperor works because of similar institutional and international realities, and because personality matters.; (AN 41563477)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563477&site=ehost-live

2.

The Logic of American Strategy in the Middle East by Carter, Ash. Survival, March 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 2 p13-24, 12p; Abstract: The Department of Defense remains engaged in the Middle East because doing so serves both America’s interests and those of its regional allies and partners.; (AN 41563478)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563478&site=ehost-live

3.

An Order of Priorities in Confronting Iran by Fitzpatrick, Mark. Survival, March 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 2 p25-29, 5p; Abstract: It is far better to implement an incomplete but effective nuclear agreement than to scrap it, hoping to achieve the best outcome while ending up with the worst.; (AN 41563480)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563480&site=ehost-live

4.

Noteworthy Survival, March 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 2 p30-32, 3p; (AN 41563481)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563481&site=ehost-live

5.

Understanding the US–Russia Nuclear Schism by Arbatov, Alexey. Survival, March 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 2 p33-66, 34p; Abstract: The deep strategic differences between the United States and Russia, and the origins of those differences, have never been properly understood by either side.; (AN 41563479)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563479&site=ehost-live

6.

Small States and Finlandisation in the Age of Trump by Mouritzen, Hans. Survival, March 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 2 p67-84, 18p; Abstract: In a multipolar world with weak institutions, and where the alternative can be chaos and war, Finlandisation is better than its reputation.; (AN 41563483)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563483&site=ehost-live

7.

Asia's Diplomacy of Violence: China–US Coercion and Regional Order by Ayson, Robert; Pardesi, Manjeet S.. Survival, March 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 2 p85-124, 40p; Abstract: Military coercion has already changed the Asia-Pacific region.; (AN 41563482)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563482&site=ehost-live

8.

Brief Notices Survival, March 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 2 pe1-e18, 18p; (AN 41563491)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563491&site=ehost-live

9.

Genius and Mastery in Military Innovation by Kollars, Nina. Survival, March 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 2 p125-138, 14p; Abstract: When it comes to creating new battlefield concepts and capabilities, buying cutting-edge machines is not enough.; (AN 41563484)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563484&site=ehost-live

10.

Was Libya’s Collapse Predictable? by Lacher, Wolfram. Survival, March 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 2 p139-152, 14p; Abstract: The debate over whether the Libyan intervention was justified should take as its starting point the imponderables facing decision-makers in March 2011.; (AN 41563487)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563487&site=ehost-live

11.

Building on the Iran Nuclear Agreement by Hannay, David; Pickering, Thomas R.. Survival, March 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 2 p153-166, 14p; Abstract: The new constraints on, and monitoring of, Iran’s nuclear programme could be held as the gold standard for a strengthened non-proliferation regime.; (AN 41563485)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563485&site=ehost-live

12.

Iran’s Revolutionary Guards: Readying Strength by Rafati, Naysan. Survival, March 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 2 p167-176, 10p; Abstract: The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps is a state sponsor of terrorism, economic juggernaut, internal security service, expeditionary force and key political actor.; (AN 41563486)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563486&site=ehost-live

13.

Book Reviews by McMaster, H.R.; Takeyh, Ray; Andréani, Gilles; Unger, David C.. Survival, March 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 2 p177-204, 28p; (AN 41563489)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563489&site=ehost-live

14.

Letter to the Editor by Jones, Nate. Survival, March 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 2 p205-210, 6p; (AN 41563488)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563488&site=ehost-live

15.

General McMaster’s Sandwich by Stevenson, Jonathan. Survival, March 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 2 p211-220, 10p; Abstract: The new US national security advisor’s effectiveness will depend on President Donald Trump’s whim.; (AN 41563490)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41563490&site=ehost-live

 

11

Terrorism and Political Violence
Volume 29, no. 2, March 2017

Record

Results

1.

What Makes Terrorism Salient? Terrorist Strategies, Political Competition, and Public Opinion by Criado, Henar. Terrorism and Political Violence, March 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 2 p197-214, 18p; Abstract: This article analyzes the determinants of terrorism saliency in public opinion. It is usually assumed that after a terrorist attack, terrorism becomes automatically salient. However, this assumption is only true in those countries where terrorist attacks are exceptional events. In democracies that have suffered domestic terrorism for decades, the evolution of terrorism saliency does not only depend on the frequency or intensity of terrorist attacks. In this article it is claimed that the tactics carried out by terrorist groups (the type of victim, especially) and the dynamics of political competition (especially the ideology of the incumbent) are also factors that explain the evolution of terrorism saliency. The article also analyzes how these two factors interact with citizens’ predispositions to explain variation in their reactions to terrorist threat. The empirical test relies on a novel database from monthly public opinion surveys in Spain from 1993 to 2012.; (AN 41478595)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41478595&site=ehost-live

2.

Why Violence Abates: Imposed and Elective Declines in Terrorist Attacks by Becker, Michael. Terrorism and Political Violence, March 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 2 p215-235, 21p; Abstract: Previous scholarship on variations in violence within a given terrorist organization has primarily focused on factors that lead to the inception or destruction of that organization. However, violence varies substantially even during the “prime” of an organization's life. This article aims to understand why violence varies in the short term within many organizations, and places a special focus on declines in violence. Specifically, I argue that terrorists face countervailing incentives in terms of how much violence to use, and that when declines in violent activity do occur, they can be divided into two types: a) elective declines, which are usually temporary and used for organizational or reputational recovery; and b) imposed declines, which are dictated by changes in the relative capability of an organization, and are more likely to be permanent. The causal pathways to each type of decline are discussed, and a plausibility probe, consisting of case studies of three terrorist organizations, is then developed to substantiate this theory. The findings have notable implications for counterterrorism policy, as they illustrate not only when and why terrorists choose to curtail violent attacks, but also the conditions that determine whether declines in violence are temporary or permanent.; (AN 41478598)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41478598&site=ehost-live

3.

Confrontations on the Issue of Terrorism Between Iran and the U.S. after 1979 by Jiang, Zhen. Terrorism and Political Violence, March 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 2 p236-253, 18p; Abstract: The issue of terrorism has been a significant source of influence on the relationship between Iran and the U.S. since the Islamic Revolution. Iran's friendship with extremist groups that are designated as terrorist groups by the U.S. State Department is seriously challenging America's foreign policy. This article attempts to explore the prospect of confrontations on the issue of terrorism between Iran and the U.S. through a detailed analysis of their different interpretations and mutual recognitions of terrorism and through an in-depth analysis of the measures each party has taken regarding this confrontation. This article argues that the confrontation between Iran and the U.S. regarding the issue of terrorism is not strictly about terrorism. Rather, it is also about the conflicts of policies that result from different security interests and political values. Resolving the issue of terrorism depends on the reconciliation of the relationship between Iran and the U.S. Without mutual trust between the two nations, Iran will continue to support extremist groups in order to increase its influence against the external and internal pressures it is currently under, and the U.S. will continue to contain Iran's regional ambitions and seek changes in its behavior.; (AN 41478597)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41478597&site=ehost-live

4.

Counter-Terrorizing: The Use of Torture in Peru's Counterterrorism Campaign by Zech, Steven T.. Terrorism and Political Violence, March 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 2 p254-276, 23p; Abstract: In this article I identify and evaluate numerous reasons why torture became common practice during the state counterterrorism campaign in Peru between 1980 and 2000, despite international and domestic legal obligations to protect human rights. I describe common structural conditions, organizational factors, and individual-level explanations often associated with torture practices. I then identify seven logics and motivations behind torture use in counterterrorism campaigns. I describe and analyze actual torture use in Peru using quantitative incident-level data, and I provide descriptive statistics concerning variation in the frequency and methods of torture. Finally, I examine specific incidents of torture to illustrate and assess the different logics and motivations for torture. I draw heavily from testimonies collected by Peru's Truth and Reconciliation Commission. I also rely on personal interviews carried out during fieldwork in the Junín and Ayacucho regions of Peru. I find that aggregate torture incidents generally coincide with political developments and shifts in violence levels and that the various state security forces used torture differently. A review of testimonies regarding specific incidents of torture suggests that multiple logics motivate state security forces, even for a single incident of torture, complicating academic efforts to formulate a parsimonious causal explanation.; (AN 41478596)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41478596&site=ehost-live

5.

The Disengagement of Indonesian Jihadists: Understanding the Pathways by Chernov Hwang, Julie. Terrorism and Political Violence, March 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 2 p277-295, 19p; Abstract: While much research has been conducted on the radicalization of Muslim militants from Jemaah Islamiyah, its spinoffs, and splinter factions; the historical roots of Indonesian radical movements; and their ideological underpinnings, far less analysis has centered on how and why individual militants may come to disengage from violence. Disengagement is defined as a gradual process through which a member of a terror group, radical movement, gang, or cult comes to reject the use of terror methods in pursuit of their goals. Utilizing original fieldwork conducted between 2010 and 2014, with fifty current and former members of Islamist extremist groups in Indonesia, this article will unpack the patterns, pathways, religious considerations, and psychological processes that propel individual militants to turn away from violence.; (AN 41478602)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41478602&site=ehost-live

6.

Just the Two of Us? Civil Conflicts, Pro-State Militants, and the Violence Premium by Ferguson, Neil T. N.. Terrorism and Political Violence, March 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 2 p296-322, 27p; Abstract: Quantitative literature discussing violence in civil conflicts tends towards a typical model of engagement between governments and revolutionaries. Whilst recent work has shown the significant impact of multiple anti-government groups, a further feature remains understudied—the role of pro-state militants. This article theorizes a “violence premium” when such groups arise, which leads to all connected groups devoting greater energy to conflict than they would in isolation. Employing duration analysis and data from The Troubles in Northern Ireland, where Republicans act as revolutionary insurgents, Loyalists as pro-state militants, and the British Army as government forces, the violence premium is empirically confirmed. Both Loyalists and Republicans deviate from their underlying strategies to attack more frequently when violence by their rivals increases, with Republicans and the British Army engaging in the same way. An extended analysis, accounting for the status of the victim, shows that the violence premium resulting from interaction between Loyalists and Republicans targeted only the civilian population of Northern Ireland, elucidating the sectarian component of The Troubles. These results show that including all conflict parties and considering how they are linked are important features in studies that aim to determine the net level of violence in civil conflicts.; (AN 41478601)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41478601&site=ehost-live

7.

Culture and Terrorism: The Role of Cultural Factors in Worldwide Terrorism (1970–2013) by Kluch, Sofia Pinero; Vaux, Alan. Terrorism and Political Violence, March 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 2 p323-341, 19p; Abstract: The relationship between terrorism and culture was systematically examined using three high-quality global databases. Contrary to prior research, terrorism—collapsed across form and era—was not related to any of Hofstede's cultural dimensions. Yet, particular forms of terrorism—incidents involving substantial casualties and damage, suicide bombings, and the proportion of incidents involving fatalities—all showed relationships with cultural dimensions. Tolerance of terrorism and relative tolerance of the 9/11 attack were related to cultural dimensions and terrorist events. Finally, populations that were relatively voiceless, disengaged from their communities, suffering, angry, and hopeless showed more tolerance of terrorism and incidents of terrorism.; (AN 41478599)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41478599&site=ehost-live

8.

The Resource Curse Reconsidered: Cash Crops and Local Violence in Kyrgyzstan by Markowitz, Lawrence P.. Terrorism and Political Violence, March 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 2 p342-358, 17p; Abstract: It is often noted in resource curse literature that agricultural economies are less conflict-prone than countries managing mobile, high-value resources. In the vast literature linking resource endowment and conflict, cash crop economies are often considered immune to civil violence, believed to stand apart from the many horrific episodes of violence and civil war centered on “lootable” wealth (such as alluvial diamonds, tin, tungsten, or other conflict minerals). But many incidents of violence—especially local violence—are in fact occurring in cash crop economies. Drawing on newspaper accounts, policy analyses, ethnographic interviews, and in-depth reports by international organizations, I examine an episode of local violence in 2010 in Kyrgyzstan. Through this case study, the article provides a better understanding of local violence in cash crop economies that can apply to other weak states.; (AN 41478600)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41478600&site=ehost-live

9.

Israel's Counter-Terrorism Policy: How Effective? by Freilich, Charles David. Terrorism and Political Violence, March 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 2 p359-376, 18p; Abstract: The percentage of Israelis killed by terrorism is higher than in any other democracy. The article analyzes the threats Israel has faced, the impact terrorism has had on Israel, and the counter-terrorism policies Israel has adopted. Terrorism has had a decisive effect on Israeli elections and national security decisions, but not the economy. Israeli counter-terrorism has often been conducted without a coherent overall policy, has failed to reflect and conflicted with broader objectives, and has greatly undermined Israel's international standing. Conversely, it has enabled Israel to live in relative security and thrive, and provided its leaders with the latitude to pursue various policies, including peace, should they wish to do so.; (AN 41478603)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41478603&site=ehost-live

10.

Organized Violence Between War and Peace by Gilbert, Danielle. Terrorism and Political Violence, March 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 2 p377-383, 7p; (AN 41478605)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41478605&site=ehost-live

11.

Jean E. Rosenfeld (Ed.). Terrorism, Identity and Legitimacy: The Four Waves Theory and Political Violence by Stack, Alisa. Terrorism and Political Violence, March 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 2 p384-385, 2p; (AN 41478604)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41478604&site=ehost-live

12.

Sean McFate. The Modern Mercenary: Private Armies and What They Mean for World Order by Gartenstein-Ross, Daveed. Terrorism and Political Violence, March 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 2 p385-386, 2p; (AN 41478606)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41478606&site=ehost-live

13.

Joby Warrick. Black Flags: The Rise of ISIS by Shaffer, Ryan. Terrorism and Political Violence, March 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 2 p387-389, 3p; (AN 41478609)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41478609&site=ehost-live

14.

Paul Gill. Lone-Actor Terrorists: A Behavioural Analysis by Hofmann, David C.. Terrorism and Political Violence, March 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 2 p389-390, 2p; (AN 41478608)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41478608&site=ehost-live

15.

V. Ward and R. Sherlock, eds. Religion and Terrorism: The Use of Violence in Abrahamic Monotheism by Denton, Donald D.. Terrorism and Political Violence, March 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 2 p390-391, 2p; (AN 41478607)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41478607&site=ehost-live

 

12

Washington Quarterly
Volume 39, no. 4, October 2016

Record

Results

1.

Will China Test Trump? Lessons from Past Campaigns and Elections by Miura, Kacie; Weiss, Jessica Chen. The Washington Quarterly, October 2016, Vol. 39 Issue: Number 4 p7-25, 19p; (AN 40735697)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40735697&site=ehost-live

2.

The Survival Strategy of the Chinese Communist Party by Dickson, Bruce J.. The Washington Quarterly, October 2016, Vol. 39 Issue: Number 4 p27-44, 18p; (AN 40735698)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40735698&site=ehost-live

3.

Unpacking the Iranian Nuclear Deal: Nuclear Latency and U.S. Foreign Policy by Mehta, Rupal N.; Whitlark, Rachel Elizabeth. The Washington Quarterly, October 2016, Vol. 39 Issue: Number 4 p45-61, 17p; (AN 40735700)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40735700&site=ehost-live

4.

Trumpism and the American Politics of Insecurity by Rojecki, Andrew. The Washington Quarterly, October 2016, Vol. 39 Issue: Number 4 p65-81, 17p; (AN 40735699)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40735699&site=ehost-live

5.

The Return of Jacksonianism: the International Implications of the Trump Phenomenon by Cha, Taesuh. The Washington Quarterly, October 2016, Vol. 39 Issue: Number 4 p83-97, 15p; (AN 40735701)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40735701&site=ehost-live

6.

Barack Obama and the Dilemmas of American Grand Strategy by Brands, Hal. The Washington Quarterly, October 2016, Vol. 39 Issue: Number 4 p101-125, 25p; (AN 40735702)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40735702&site=ehost-live

7.

Belligerent Minimalism: The Trump Administration and the Middle East by Lynch, Marc. The Washington Quarterly, October 2016, Vol. 39 Issue: Number 4 p127-144, 18p; (AN 40735704)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40735704&site=ehost-live

8.

Reading Reagan in Tehran: A Strategy of Realistic Engagement by McFaul, Michael; Milani, Abbas. The Washington Quarterly, October 2016, Vol. 39 Issue: Number 4 p145-163, 19p; (AN 40735705)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40735705&site=ehost-live

9.

Confronting Pakistan's Support for Terrorism: Don't Designate, Calibrate by Tankel, Stephen. The Washington Quarterly, October 2016, Vol. 39 Issue: Number 4 p165-179, 15p; (AN 40735703)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40735703&site=ehost-live

10.

The Strategic Illogic of Counterterrorism Policy by Jordan, Jenna; Kosal, Margaret E.; Rubin, Lawrence. The Washington Quarterly, October 2016, Vol. 39 Issue: Number 4 p181-192, 12p; (AN 40735706)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40735706&site=ehost-live

11.

The Lingering Problem of Fragile States by Call, Charles T.. The Washington Quarterly, October 2016, Vol. 39 Issue: Number 4 p193-209, 17p; (AN 40735707)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=40735707&site=ehost-live

 

13

West European Politics
Volume 40, no. 4, July 2017

Record

Results

1.

The Gordon Smith and Vincent Wright Memorial Prizes 2016 West European Politics, July 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 4 p(iii)-(iii); (AN 41613825)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41613825&site=ehost-live

2.

Is a corrupt government totally unacceptable? by Cordero, Guillermo; Blais, André. West European Politics, July 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 4 p645-662, 18p; Abstract: AbstractCorrupt governments are not always punished by voters. Under certain circumstances citizens consider voting for the incumbent party even if the party is perceived as corrupt. Using survey data for Spain, this article analyses what makes citizens reject (or not) the idea of voting for a corrupt party. Previous research has shown that party identification, ideology and political information play a role in voters’ reactions to corruption. The article argues that voters judge corruption in relative terms; what matters is not how corrupt the incumbent party is perceived to be but whether it is deemed to be more corrupt than the other parties.; (AN 41613823)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41613823&site=ehost-live

3.

Making states for the single market: European integration and the reshaping of economic states in the Southern and Eastern peripheries of Europe by Bruszt, Laszlo; Vukov, Visnja. West European Politics, July 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 4 p663-687, 25p; Abstract: AbstractEuropean integration has profoundly reshaped states in Europe’s peripheries. It has deprived them of the traditional means of autonomously managing development, imposed institutions defending the integrity of the regional market from domestic actors, and provided them, in exchange, with EU-level development policies. However, whereas in the South the EU has relied primarily on incentives for remaking the economic state, in the East it has engaged in direct institution-building. The different EU strategies pushed the evolution of the economic state in the two peripheries in different directions and the two parts of Europe now face different developmental dilemmas. Despite their differences, neither the Eastern nor the Southern states have the capacity to get in synch the triple challenge of integration: playing by the uniform regional rules, improving their positions in the European markets and extending the range of domestic beneficiaries of integration. While the ensuing economic and political tensions might endanger regional integration, EU-level capacities for addressing the developmental problems of the peripheries are in short supply.; (AN 41613824)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41613824&site=ehost-live

4.

Toe the line, break the whip: explaining floor dissent in parliamentary democracies by Willumsen, David M.; Öhberg, Patrik. West European Politics, July 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 4 p688-716, 29p; Abstract: AbstractThis article analyses the drivers of individual dissent in floor voting in parliamentary regimes. It focuses on the effect of ideological heterogeneity in legislative parties on individual MPs’ voting behaviour, as well as the different incentives caused by the differing consequences of defection and abstention. Combining individual-level survey and voting data from the Swedish Riksdag, neither of which is subject to selection bias, the study overcomes several limitations of previous research. It shows that MPs’ decisions to dissent are partly driven by ideological differences with their party, but also by the imperatives of maintaining a government majority in a parliamentary regime, along with the level of influence MPs exert on legislation. It also highlights the importance of distinguishing between abstaining from voting and defecting. Merely pooling the two oversimplifies the behaviour of MPs.; (AN 41613829)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41613829&site=ehost-live

5.

Decentralisation and regional cabinet size: the Spanish case (1979–2015) by Vall-Prat, Pau; Rodon, Toni. West European Politics, July 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 4 p717-740, 24p; Abstract: AbstractThis article explores under what conditions regional governments tend to have larger or smaller cabinets. The main contention is that cross-regional variation in cabinet size is partly explained by the dynamics set up by the multilevel system of government, mainly territorial decentralisation, multilevel government (in)congruence or the existence of nationally distinct regions. The hypotheses are tested with a new and original dataset built upon the Spanish case (1979–2015). Findings show that regions with more welfare state policies, especially when the region’s economic capacity is high, and nationally distinct regions tend to have bigger executives. In contrast, decentralisation in the form of basic state functions and government incongruence do not have a significant effect. Results have important implications for our understanding of sub-national territorial institutions and their interaction with decentralisation dynamics.; (AN 41613828)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41613828&site=ehost-live

6.

It takes two: how Eurosceptic public opinion and party divisions influence party positions by Spoon, Jae-Jae; Williams, Christopher. West European Politics, July 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 4 p741-762, 22p; Abstract: AbstractDo parties respond to voters’ preferences on European integration in elections to the European Parliament (EP)? Following recent research that shows political party responsiveness to Eurosceptic attitudes during EP elections is conditioned by party characteristics, this article seeks to understand how party unity on European integration affects party responsiveness to Euroscepticism. It argues that when Eurosceptic attitudes among voters are high and the parties are divided in their position on European integration, parties will be more responsive to voters and take a more Eurosceptic position. To test the theoretical expectations, the study uses data from the Chapel Hill Expert Survey, the Euromanifestos Project, and European Election Study for 1989–2009 for over 120 parties across 20 European Union member states. The findings have important implications for understanding the nature of democratic representation in the European Union.; (AN 41613826)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41613826&site=ehost-live

7.

Instrumental political support: bringing policy preferences back into explanations of EU support by Belot, Céline; Guinaudeau, Isabelle. West European Politics, July 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 4 p763-790, 28p; Abstract: AbstractThere is a joint development towards Europeanisation of public policies and an increasing visibility and politicisation of European issues in EU member states. In this context, the degree of fit between individuals’ policy preferences and European norms could be expected to influence support for the EU: this support might increase when Europeanisation makes the desired policies more likely, and decrease when it hinders these policies. Multilevel analyses of the 2014 wave of the European Election Study confirms the existence of such instrumental support for the EU. The findings demonstrate that this support is shaped by policy preferences on state intervention, immigration, moral issues and environmental protection. The results also show that the impact of these policy preferences is modulated by the level of integration of the designated policy, by the weight of the policy issue in the country and, in some cases, by the level of individual political knowledge.; (AN 41613827)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41613827&site=ehost-live

8.

How people organise cultural attitudes: cultural belief systems and the populist radical right by Daenekindt, Stijn; de Koster, Willem; van der Waal, Jeroen. West European Politics, July 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 4 p791-811, 21p; Abstract: AbstractPolitical scientists generally agree that all individuals structure their cultural attitudes in the same unidimensional fashion. However, various populist radical right parties remarkably combine moral progressiveness with conservatism regarding immigration-related issues. This suggests that the structuring of cultural attitudes among the electorate may also be more complex than typically assumed. Applying Correlational Class Analysis to representative survey data, the study uncovers three cultural belief systems. For individuals adhering to an integratedone, all cultural attitudes are interdependent, as typically assumed. However, two alternative belief systems are also uncovered: intermediateand partitioned. In the latter, positions on one cultural attitude (e.g. ethnocentrism) are barely related to positions on others (e.g. rejecting Islam or opposing homosexuality). The existence of multiple cultural belief systems challenges the widely held assumption that all people organise their cultural attitudes similarly. Both political party agendas and individuals’ education level and religion appear key to understanding variation in belief systems.; (AN 41613830)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41613830&site=ehost-live

9.

Still men’s parties? Gender and the radical right in comparative perspective by Erzeel, Silvia; Rashkova, Ekaterina R.. West European Politics, July 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 4 p812-820, 9p; Abstract: AbstractThis framing paper introduces the symposium on gender and the radical right. With the exception of a few recent studies, gender issues have received little attention in research on the European radical right. The purpose of this symposium is to address that and examine (1) whether radical right parties are still ‘men’s parties’ – parties led and supported primarily by men and (2) to what extent and how women and women’s concerns have been included by these parties. It argues that radical right parties have changed their appeal since their origins in the 1980s. There is now evidence of the fact that radical right parties, at least in some countries, exhibit an active political involvement of women and engage in some representation of women’s concerns. This puts them in a more ‘standardised’ political position vis-à-vis other parties. Given the current lack of focus on this topic, and given the recent gendered changes in radical right parties, this symposium stresses the academic and political importance of studying gender relations in radical right politics.; (AN 41613833)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41613833&site=ehost-live

10.

Gender, populist attitudes, and voting: explaining the gender gap in voting for populist radical right and populist radical left parties by Spierings, Niels; Zaslove, Andrej. West European Politics, July 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 4 p821-847, 27p; Abstract: AbstractEmpirical studies have demonstrated that compared to almost all other parties, populist radical right (PRR) parties draw more votes from men than from women. However, the two dominant explanations that are generally advanced to explain this disparity – gender differences regarding socio-economic position and lower perceptions regarding the threat of immigrants – cannot fully explain the difference. The article contends that it might actually be gender differences regarding the conceptualisation of society and politics – populist attitudes – that explain the gender gap. Thus, the gap may be due, in part, to differences in socialisation. The article analyses EES 2014 data on voting for the populist radical right and the populist radical left in nine European countries. Across countries, the gender gap in voting for the PRR is indeed partly explained by populist attitudes. For populist radical left parties, the results are less clear, suggesting that populism has different meanings to voters on the left and on the right.; (AN 41613832)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41613832&site=ehost-live

11.

Are (populist) radical right parties Männerparteien? Evidence from Bulgaria by Rashkova, Ekaterina R.; Zankina, Emilia. West European Politics, July 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 4 p848-868, 21p; Abstract: AbstractThis paper focuses on the representation of women in radical right parties and examines the often assumed relationship between the radical right and gender, namely that radical right parties are overwhelmingly ran, supported by, and representing the male part of the population. Using data from elections, party platforms, and parliamentary committees the paper asks ‘Are PRR parties Männerparteien?’ Using data from Bulgaria, we suggest that the Männerparteienargument is too simplistic and argue that in order to make a claim about representation, one needs to study both female and male MPs and across all party families. We find that while radical right parties are still primarily composed of men, an examination of the substantive representation of women’s issues, puts this relationship into question. Furthermore, we show that while men outnumber women in all political parties, both radical right women and men have been more active in women’s issues than their gender counterparts from other political parties. These findings suggest two things: one, we cannot study gender equality matters without comparing the activity of both men and women; and two, the classification of radical right parties as Männerparteien based on descriptive representation only, is too simplistic and to an extent, misleading.; (AN 41613831)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41613831&site=ehost-live

12.

Caring for the elderly in the family or in the nation? Gender, women and migrant care labour in the Lega Nord by Scrinzi, Francesca. West European Politics, July 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 4 p869-886, 18p; Abstract: AbstractThis article aims at gendering our understanding of populist radical right ideology, policy and activism in Italy. It does so by focusing on migrant care labour, which provides a strategic site for addressing the relationship between anti-immigration politics and the gendered and racialised division of work. Three arrangements and understandings of elderly care are analysed, whereby care work should be performed ‘in the family and in the nation’, ‘in the family/outside the nation’ and ‘in the nation/outside the family’. Party documents and interviews with women activists are used to show how the activists’ views and experiences partly diverge from the Lega Nord rhetoric and policy on immigration, gender and care work. The article locates populist radical right politics in the context of the international division of reproductive labour in Italy and suggests the relevance of analysing gender relations in populist radical right parties in connection with national care regimes.; (AN 41613835)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41613835&site=ehost-live

13.

Gender, right-wing populism, and immigrant integration policies in France, 1989–2012 by Morgan, Kimberly J.. West European Politics, July 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 4 p887-906, 20p; Abstract: AbstractImmigrant integration has been on the political agenda in France since at least the late 1980s, yet starting in the early 2000s this issue became bound up with concerns about the oppression of minority women. This article examines the evolution of the issue over two decades, pinpointing when and why debates over integration took on a gendered cast. The article’s explanation centres on two factors – the growing threat of the Front Nationalcoupled with the legitimation of gender-based claims in French politics. These claims were embraced by conservative politicians seeking to adopt a harder line toward immigration and led to the refashioning of core Republican concepts such as égalitéand laïcitéas being about gender equality. The use of similar themes by the Front Nationalas it has sought to move in from the political fringe reveals how gendered claims can be deployed in an effort to keep anti-immigrant policies within the boundaries of liberal values.; (AN 41613836)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41613836&site=ehost-live

14.

The European Court of Justice and its political impact by Blauberger, Michael; Schmidt, Susanne K.. West European Politics, July 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 4 p907-918, 12p; Abstract: AbstractThis article reviews recent advances in the study of the European Court of Justice (ECJ) and its political impact at the European and member state levels. New quantitative as well as qualitative analyses show with great empirical precision that member state preferences guide the Court. The article summarises these findings, but argues that greater attention needs to be given to the (over-)constitutionalisation of EU law in order to fully capture the political impact of ECJ jurisprudence. Even if European judges are less activist than is often assumed and individual decisions are more restrained in the face of member state opposition, incrementally, case law evolves in a highly expansive fashion. And, exercising caution regarding unrealistic expectations about quasi-deterministic judicial law-making, it is found that the Court’s constitutionalised jurisprudence impacts heavily on European and member state policy-making.; (AN 41613834)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41613834&site=ehost-live

15.

The Spanish general elections of 2015 and 2016: a new stage in democratic politics? by Lancaster, Thomas D.. West European Politics, July 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 4 p919-937, 19p; (AN 41613837)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41613837&site=ehost-live

 

14

World Policy Journal
Volume 32, no. 4, December 2015

Record

Results

1.

Latin America on Life Support? World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p1-2, 2p; (AN 37471479)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=37471479&site=ehost-live

2.

The Big Question: Fixing Roles: What Are the Challenges Determining Your Country’s Position Within Latin America? by Turzi, Mariano; Canofre, Fernanda; de la Paz Meléndez, Gabriela; Serrano, Lorena Oyarzún; Castillo, Hernán; Mendizabal, Enrique; Munyo, Ignacio; Fontana, Andrés. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p3-8, 6p; (AN 37471473)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=37471473&site=ehost-live

3.

Imagining Eden by Gurría-Quintana, Ángel. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p10-13, 4p; (AN 37471476)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=37471476&site=ehost-live

4.

Map Room: Latin Americans on the Move World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p14-15, 2p; (AN 37471480)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=37471480&site=ehost-live

5.

The Hangover: Latin America Recovers After Shot of Success by Ávila, Ricardo. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p17-22, 6p; (AN 37471483)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=37471483&site=ehost-live

6.

Anatomy: Chinese Investment in South America World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p24-25, 2p; (AN 37471471)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=37471471&site=ehost-live

7.

Goodbye, Venezuela by Reeve, Christopher. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p26-36, 11p; (AN 37471481)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=37471481&site=ehost-live

8.

The Changing Face of Cuba by Mattingly, Amanda. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p37-49, 13p; (AN 37471482)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=37471482&site=ehost-live

9.

Free Trade: A Ticket to a Bigger Party by Gurría, Ángel. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p51-56, 6p; (AN 37471470)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=37471470&site=ehost-live

10.

Nauru: A Cautionary Tale by Sokhin, Vlad. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p58-71, 14p; (AN 37471477)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=37471477&site=ehost-live

11.

The Dark Net: Policing the Internet’s Underworld by Omand, David. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p75-82, 8p; (AN 37471469)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=37471469&site=ehost-live

12.

Deadly Interactions by Yayla, Ahmet S.. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p83-91, 9p; (AN 37471475)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=37471475&site=ehost-live

13.

Open SESAME: A Powerful Light Attracts Middle Eastern Scientists by Blaustein, Richard. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p92-99, 8p; (AN 37471478)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=37471478&site=ehost-live

14.

Leadership Challenges in a Hyper-Changing World by Genovese, Michael A.. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p100-107, 8p; (AN 37471472)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=37471472&site=ehost-live

15.

Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow by Andelman, David A.. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p108-118, 11p; (AN 37471474)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=37471474&site=ehost-live

16.

Democracy by Andelman, David. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p1-2, 2p; (AN 28340185)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=28340185&site=ehost-live

17.

The Big Question: What Is The Biggest Threat To Democracy? by Kaplinski, Jaan; Kathrada, Ahmed; Raza, Raheel; Al-Nafjan, Eman; Wangyal, Lobsang; Hegyi, Gyula; Sha’er, Sawsan; Koukku-Ronde, Ritva. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p3-7, 5p; (AN 28340186)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=28340186&site=ehost-live

18.

Viva Democracy! by de Beer, Patrice. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p9-14, 6p; (AN 28340187)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=28340187&site=ehost-live

19.

The Art of Dissent: A Chat with Ai Weiwei by Andelman, David. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p15-21, 7p; (AN 28340188)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=28340188&site=ehost-live

20.

Anatomy: Autocracy Index World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p22-23, 2p; (AN 28340189)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=28340189&site=ehost-live

21.

Afghanistan: Mobilizing for Democracy by Creighton, James. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p25-36, 12p; (AN 28340190)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=28340190&site=ehost-live

22.

Map Room: Electoral Fraud in Afghanistan by Hastey, Joshua. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p28-29, 2p; (AN 28340191)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=28340191&site=ehost-live

23.

Serving Democracy, or America, Abroad? by Kinstler, Linda. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p37-47, 11p; (AN 28340193)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=28340193&site=ehost-live

24.

Ban on Democracy: A Conversation with Ban Ki-moon World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p49-55, 7p; (AN 28340192)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=28340192&site=ehost-live

25.

Water and Our World by Stirton, Brent. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p56-67, 12p; (AN 28340194)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=28340194&site=ehost-live

26.

Ivory Coast: Victor’s Justice by Corey-Boulet, Robbie. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p68-79, 12p; (AN 28340196)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=28340196&site=ehost-live

27.

Basque-ing in Peace by Matloff, Judith. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p81-88, 8p; (AN 28340195)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=28340195&site=ehost-live

28.

Argentina: Back to Peronism by Schmall, Emily. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p90-99, 10p; (AN 28340197)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=28340197&site=ehost-live

29.

Turning Porsches into Malbec by Schmall, Emily. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p97-97, 1p; (AN 28340198)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=28340198&site=ehost-live

30.

Hidden Beneath the Seas by O’Dor, Ron; Berghe, Edward. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p101-108, 8p; (AN 28340199)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=28340199&site=ehost-live

31.

… For the Sake of Change by Andelman, David. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p110-119, 10p; (AN 28340200)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=28340200&site=ehost-live

 
 

15

World Politics
Volume 69, no. 2, April 2017

Record

Results

1.

WPO volume 69 issue 2 Cover and Back matter World Politics, April 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 2 pb1-b2, 2p; (AN 41513301)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41513301&site=ehost-live

2.

WPO volume 69 issue 2 Cover and Front matter World Politics, April 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 2 pf1-f7, 7p; (AN 41513299)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41513299&site=ehost-live

3.

Landowners and Democracy by Albertus, Michael. World Politics, April 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 2 p233-276, 44p; Abstract: Are large landowners, especially those engaged in labor-dependent agriculture, detrimental to democratization and the subsequent survival of democracy? This assumption is at the heart of both canonical and recent influential work on regime transition and durability. Using an original panel data set on the extent of labor-dependent agriculture in countries across the world since 1930, the author finds that labor-dependent agriculture was indeed historically bad for democratic stability and stunted the extension of suffrage, parliamentary independence, and free and fair elections. However, the negative influence of labor-dependent agriculture on democracy started to turn positive around the time of democracy's third wave. The dual threats of land reform and costly domestic insurgencies in that period—often with more potent consequences under dictators—plausibly prompted landowners to push for democracy with strong horizontal constraints and favorable institutions that could protect their property more reliably over the long term than could dictatorship. The shift in support for democracy by labor-dependent landowners is a major untold story of democracy's third wave and helps explain the persistent democratic deficit in many new democracies.; (AN 41513303)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41513303&site=ehost-live

4.

Patronage, Trust, and State Capacity by Bustikova, Lenka; Corduneanu-Huci, Cristina. World Politics, April 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 2 p277-326, 50p; Abstract: What explains different levels of clientelism across countries? Why do some politicians deliver clientelistic goods to their electoral constituencies, and why do some voters demand them? This article focuses on the historical origins of trust in states and shows that they have a lasting impact on contemporary patterns of patronage. The shift to programmatic politics reflects a historical transition from personalized trust in politicians to trust in impersonal bureaucracies tasked by political parties to implement policy. Past experience with public bureaucracy informs the expectations of voters and parties regarding the performance of the state and its ability to provide public goods, which in turn shape the degree of clientelistic exchange across societies. To capture state capacity, the authors focus on the critical juncture before the expansion of women's suffrage, and use the ability of public bureaucracies to reduce infant mortality in the interwar period as a proxy for historical state capacity and as an instrument to predict trust. Macrodata from eightyeight electoral democracies and microdata from the most recent wave of the World Value Survey provide supportive evidence for the theory.; (AN 41513300)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41513300&site=ehost-live

5.

Race, Resources, and Representation by Bueno, Natália S.; Dunning, Thad. World Politics, April 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 2 p327-365, 39p; Abstract: What explains the persistence of racial or ethnic inequalities in descriptive representation in the absence of strongly politicized racial or ethnic cleavages? This article uses new data to demonstrate a substantial racial gap between voters and politicians in Brazil. The authors show that this disparity is not plausibly due to racial preferences in the electorate as a whole, for instance, deference toward white candidates or discrimination against nonwhites, and that barriers to candidate entry or discrimination by party leaders do not likely explain the gap. Instead, they document persistent resource disparities between white and nonwhite candidates, including large differences in personal assets and campaign contributions. The findings suggest that elite closure—investments by racial and economic elites on behalf of elite candidates—help perpetuate a white political class, even in the absence of racialized politics. By underscoring this avenue through which representational disparities persist, the article contributes to research on elite power in democratic settings.; (AN 41513304)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41513304&site=ehost-live

6.

Paying for War and Building States by Saylor, Ryan; Wheeler, Nicholas C.. World Politics, April 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 2 p366-408, 43p; Abstract: Many scholars believe that intense warfare propelled state formation in early modern Europe because rulers built tax institutions to pay for wars. Scholars likewise cite milder geopolitical pressures to explain the lackluster state building in the developing world. The authors analyze episodes of ferocious warfare in and beyond Europe and find that despite similar fiscal strains, not all governments built strong tax institutions to service wartime debt. When net creditors in a country's credit market were part of the ruling political coalition, they pressed governments to diversify taxes and strengthen fiscal institutions to ensure debt service. But when net debtors held political sway, governments were indifferent to debt servicing and fiscal invigoration. Coalitional politics can help to explain why mounting debt-service obligations led to fiscal institution building in some cases, but not others. The analysis highlights how the private economic interests of ruling coalition members can affect state building.; (AN 41513302)
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=41513302&site=ehost-live

 

.

MY ACCOUNT   |   CATALOG   |   NATO LIBGUIDES   |   JOURNAL TITLES   |   ASK A QUESTION