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Journal Titles: REGIONAL AND FEDERAL STUDIES --- WORLD POLITICS

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1

Regional and Federal Studies
Volume 27, no. 2, March 2017

Record

Results

1.

Advancing the study of political cleavages through experimentation: Revisiting regionalism and redistributive preferences in Canada by Davidson, Adrienne; Lesch, Matthew; Héroux-Legault, Maxime; Whyte, Tanya; Asaf, Zain; Czuba, Karol; Porisky, Alesha. Regional & Federal Studies, March 2017, Vol. 27 Issue: Number 2 p103-125, 23p; Abstract: ABSTRACTThe maintenance of welfare state policies requires citizen support for the provision of a social safety net through taxation and redistribution. Research has shown that a diverse political polity presents a risk to the welfare state; however, Canada bucks the trend and does not see citizen support for economic redistribution decline in response to immigration-based population diversity. Using Canada as our case, we argue that scholars of welfare state politics and redistribution should turn their attention to other sources of population heterogeneity in an effort to better understand how different political cleavages affect citizens’ redistributive preferences. We use an online experimental survey to manipulate the in-group identity of 500 Canadians. The survey enables respondents to identify with other in-group identities along regional, linguistic, income-group, and urban/rural characteristics. Our results find that while Canadians do have a strong baseline preference for redistributive behaviour, regional and linguistic cleavages moderate this outcome.; (AN 41852447)
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2.

Subnational political regimes and formal economic regulation: Evidence from Russian regions by Libman, Alexander. Regional & Federal Studies, March 2017, Vol. 27 Issue: Number 2 p127-151, 25p; Abstract: ABSTRACTThe paper contributes to the studies of effects of political regimes on public policies by looking at a previously unexplored aspect of this issue: the propensity of political regimes to create vast and extensive formal regulation. To study this topic, it applies subnational comparative method and uses a dataset of subnational regions of Russia, which provides a unique opportunity for a large-N investigation of the research question because of substantial variation of regional political regimes and regulatory environments and because of availability of a proxy for comparing the use of formal regulation across regions. The paper shows that more competitive regimes are more likely to expand the formal law than less competitive ones; however, the implications of this expansion of formal law for the economy are ambiguous.; (AN 41852448)
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3.

Multi-level governance in the EU and EU democracy: Democratic legitimacy, democratic accountability and transparency of the European offices of the English local authorities in Brussels by Panara, Carlo; Varney, Michael Robert. Regional & Federal Studies, March 2017, Vol. 27 Issue: Number 2 p153-170, 18p; Abstract: ABSTRACTThis paper seeks to examine the role and functions of the representative offices of English local authorities in Brussels by considering the democratic legitimacy (i.e. linkage to elected councillors or mayors), accountability and transparency of the office’s activities. The study demonstrates that the offices differ in their governance arrangements and funding, which has a direct impact on the approach to democratic legitimacy and accountability, noting that those offices which rely most heavily on direct funding from a single authority or a combined authority have the closest links to the authorities concerned. The transparency of the offices varies considerably, with clear distinctions between offices that are creatures of contract or where offices are an emanation of the authority concerned. The pattern here is less dependent on the pattern of funding of the office and depends more on the availability of resources and the approach adopted by the office itself.; (AN 41852449)
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4.

Analysing stages of subnational mobilisation across the European Union: The case of subnational administrations in Turkey by Özçelik, Ali Onur. Regional & Federal Studies, March 2017, Vol. 27 Issue: Number 2 p171-199, 29p; Abstract: ABSTRACTSubnational mobilisation literature has tended to focus on EU members and either their establishment of liaison offices or the engagement activities of their subnational administrations (SNAs) with the EU institutions in Brussels. Extending this scope to include cases from a candidate state, this article aims to enhance our understanding of such processes by proposing a four-stage model for subnational mobilisation in the EU. The model includes: growing awareness; changing organizational settings; building transnational activities; and conducting EU-level activities in Brussels. Based on 65 semi-structured interviews with representatives from local and national institutions in Turkey and EU institutions in Brussels, this work evaluates six SNAs from three Turkish cities (İzmir, Samsun and Diyarbakır) between 1999 and 2013. Findings reveal that patterns of subnational mobilisation can vary significantly within a single candidate country, owing mostly to organizational-level factors and region-specific factors related to how particular administrations are embedded.; (AN 41852450)
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5.

The new governance of welfare states in the United States and Europe. Between decentralization and centralization in the activation era by Moreno, Luis. Regional & Federal Studies, March 2017, Vol. 27 Issue: Number 2 p201-203, 3p; (AN 41852451)
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2

RUSI Journal
Volume 162, no. 2, March 2017

Record

Results

1.

Foreword by De Angelis, Emma. The RUSI Journal, March 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 2 p3-3, 1p; (AN 42586578)
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2.

UK General Election by Fallon, Michael; Griffith, Nia; Farron, Tim. The RUSI Journal, March 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 2 p4-7, 4p; Abstract: As the British general election approaches, RUSI asks each of the main political parties to outline their views on current defence and security challenges, and their proposals for future policy.; (AN 42586577)
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3.

The Rebalance to Asia Under Trump by Cullen, Patrick. The RUSI Journal, March 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 2 p8-15, 8p; Abstract: Attempts to predict the future shape of President Donald Trump’s defence policy in the Asia-Pacific are a challenge, at best. Nevertheless, Patrick Cullen argues that, in contrast to early assumptions that he would initiate a more isolationist defence policy and break with the previous administration’s Rebalance to Asia policy, Trump is more likely to adopt a hawkish – if unpredictable – enforcement of the policy’s key defence objectives. Gauging whether the Trump administration will bring either change from, or continuity with, the military component of the Rebalance to Asia policy will require keeping an eye on each of the policy’s subcategories.; (AN 42586579)
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4.

Britain and the Origins and Future of the European Defence and Security Mechanism by Heuser, Beatrice. The RUSI Journal, March 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 2 p16-23, 8p; Abstract: Throughout the second half of the twentieth century, the UK played a key role in the creation and development of a flexible and sustainable mechanism for European defence and security. Beatrice Heuser reviews the history of this engagement, and argues that changes in the UK’s institutional relationship with European partners should not be allowed to undermine the overarching principles of defence cooperation.; (AN 42586581)
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5.

The Policy Value of Quantitative Atrocity Forecasting Models by Nanlohy, Sascha; Butcher, Charles; Goldsmith, Benjamin E. The RUSI Journal, March 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 2 p24-32, 9p; Abstract: It is time to integrate quantitative atrocity forecasting more directly and systematically into the foreign policy processes of middle and major powers interested in preventing these terrible but all too common events. Sascha Nanlohy, Charles Butcher and Benjamin E Goldsmith discuss the potential utility of relatively reliable mid-to-long-term forecasts, using a number of examples to illustrate the main points.; (AN 42586580)
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6.

Friction and Inequality among Peacekeepers in Mali by Cold-Ravnkilde, Signe; Albrecht, Peter; Haugegaard, Rikke. The RUSI Journal, March 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 2 p34-42, 9p; Abstract: The United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) was established in 2013 to support Mali’s peace process. It represents an emerging practice of deploying UN peacekeeping missions in asymmetrical conflict environments where there is no peace to keep. While MINUSMA represents Europe’s return to peacekeeping, the largest troop contributors by a wide margin are African countries. Through exploring the task of securing mission convoys to the northern regions of the country, Signe Cold-Ravnkilde, Peter Albrecht and Rikke Haugegaard show how inequalities between European and African soldiers shape the distribution of death, danger and supplies in what has been named the world’s deadliest UN mission.; (AN 42586584)
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7.

The Deputy by King, Anthony. The RUSI Journal, March 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 2 p44-51, 8p; Abstract: The British Army has traditionally been sceptical about the role of deputy commanders. However, on recent operations, deputy commanders have played an increasingly important executive role. In this article, Anthony King examines why they have become more important and analyses the deep cultural reasons that explain why – even today – the British Army has been slow to embrace the concept of the deputy commander.; (AN 42586583)
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8.

Innovation Strategies for Defence by Ford, Matthew; Hodgetts, Timothy; Williams, David. The RUSI Journal, March 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 2 p52-58, 7p; Abstract: Over the past 20 years, the Defence Medical Services (DMS, the umbrella organisation for medical provision within the British armed forces) has been innovating consistently and at pace within the Ministry of Defence. The result of this sustained effort has led to progressive improvement in the outcomes of the critically injured. Separately, it has also led to global transformational innovation in support of the response to the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone. Through planned and orchestrated interventions across the entire organisation, from leadership to technology, medical practices to training and organisational design, the DMS can legitimately claim to have achieved a ‘Revolution in Military Medical Affairs’. Matthew Ford, Timothy Hodgetts and David Williams examine the innovation lifecycle within the DMS as it defines its response to the challenges of the changing character of conflict and consider the way defence medicine is an example to the wider military.; (AN 42586582)
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9.

Drawing the Falklands by Thompson, Julian; Kitson, Linda. The RUSI Journal, March 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 2 p60-66, 7p; Abstract: Major General Julian Thompson served in the Royal Marines for more than 30 years, and commanded 3 Commando Brigade during the Falklands War in 1982. He was in charge of much of the land fighting during that conflict, and has written several books on military history.Linda Kitson was the first woman to be commissioned by the Artistic Records Committee of the Imperial War Museum as the official War Artist for the Falklands Task Force – the first female artist officially to accompany troops in battle. She sailed for the South Atlantic in May 1982 on Queen Elizabeth IIwith 5 Infantry Brigade, and then transferred to SS Canberraand disembarked at San Carlos on 3 June. She then followed British forces across the island to Stanley. She spent three months drawing all aspects of the daily life of the troops, working quickly and producing more than 400 drawings in extreme weather conditions. On her return to Britain in July 1982, her drawings were exhibited at the Imperial War Museum.Thirty-five years after the Falklands War, the RUSI Journalasked them for their views on how wars are represented and remembered. What followed was a fascinating conversation in which they discussed the past, present and future of war art; its place in the wider realm of visual art and in light of the 24-hour news coverage and social media images of war that dominate today’s world; the relationship between war artists and their subjects; and the role war art can play in helping veterans and societies to remember the experiences of conflict.; (AN 42586586)
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10.

War: An Enquiry by Roberts, Peter. The RUSI Journal, March 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 2 p68-69, 2p; (AN 42586585)
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11.

Australia’s Defence Strategy: Evaluating Alternatives for a Contested Asia by Layton, Peter. The RUSI Journal, March 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 2 p69-70, 2p; (AN 42586587)
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12.

The Balkans in the Cold War by Eyal, Jonathan. The RUSI Journal, March 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 2 p70-71, 2p; (AN 42586589)
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13.

The Making of a Salafi Muslim Woman: Paths to Conversion by Sarac, Busra. The RUSI Journal, March 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 2 p72-73, 2p; (AN 42586588)
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14.

King Arthur’s Wars: The Anglo-Saxon Conquest of England by Dear, Keith. The RUSI Journal, March 2017, Vol. 162 Issue: Number 2 p73-74, 2p; (AN 42586590)
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3

Security and Human Rights
Volume 26, no. 1, December 2015

Record

Results

1.

Foreword Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p1-2, 2p; (AN 38099559)
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2.

Key Issues of the German osceChairmanship 2016 Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p3-10, 8p; (AN 38099557)
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3.

What German Responsibility Means Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p11-24, 14p; (AN 38099574)
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4.

Russian Views of the osceand the 2016 German Chairmanship Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p25-32, 8p; (AN 38099562)
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5.

The United States and the osceafter the Ukraine Crisis Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p33-47, 15p; (AN 38099604)
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6.

Successful Small States in the osceand the German Chairmanship of 2016 Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p48-64, 17p; (AN 38099560)
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7.

How Can a Dialogue be Restarted with Russia? Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p65-68, 4p; (AN 38099600)
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8.

Human Rights in Times of Crisis Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p69-77, 9p; (AN 38099653)
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9.

Conventional Arms Control in Europe Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p78-87, 10p; (AN 38099601)
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10.

Ukraine, Protracted Conflicts and the osce Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p88-106, 19p; (AN 38099605)
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11.

Tearing Down Real and Cognitive Walls Preventing Osce Compassion For Human Security in South-Eastern Europe Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p107-116, 10p; (AN 38099602)
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12.

The osceNetwork of Think Tanks and Academic Institutions Security and Human Rights, December 2015, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 1 p117-121, 5p; (AN 38099663)
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4

Security Dialogue
Volume 48, no. 3, June 2017

Record

Results

1.

Knowledge of practice: A multi-sited event ethnography of border security fairs in Europe and North America by Baird, Theodore. Security Dialogue, June 2017, Vol. 48 Issue: Number 3 p187-205, 19p; Abstract: This article takes the reader inside four border security fairs in Europe and North America to examine the knowledge practices of border security professionals. Building on the border security as practice research agenda, the analysis focuses on the production, circulation, and consumption of scarce forms of knowledge. To explore situated knowledge of border security practices, I develop an approach to multi-sited event ethnography to observe and interpret knowledge that may be hard to access at the security fairs. The analysis focuses on mechanisms for disseminating and distributing scarce forms of knowledge, technological materializations of situated knowledge, expressions of transversal knowledge of security problems, how masculinities structure knowledge in gendered ways, and how unease is expressed through imagined futures in order to anticipate emergent solutions to proposed security problems. The article concludes by reflecting on the contradictions at play at fairs and how to address such contradictions through alternative knowledges and practices.; (AN 42370520)
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2.

Masculinity nostalgia: How war and occupation inspire a yearning for gender order by MacKenzie, Megan; Foster, Alana. Security Dialogue, June 2017, Vol. 48 Issue: Number 3 p206-223, 18p; Abstract: This article investigates how war and occupation disrupt and produce new gender norms. It explores civilian masculinities and the ways in which masculinities are impacted by conflict and insecurity. Focusing on the West Bank, we argue that insecurity and occupation create the conditions for masculinity nostalgia, or a yearning for a set of gender norms and relations linked to fantasies of a secure, ‘traditional’ and ordered past. Masculinity nostalgia builds on conceptions of thwarted masculinity and the ways in which individuals are held accountable to gender norms. The article draws on interviews with Palestinians to highlight how masculinity nostalgia is associated with three particular identities: father, breadwinner and landowner. We demonstrate that Palestinian civilians lament the ways in which the occupation has impacted men’s ability to fulfil such archetypical identities, at the same time as they reaffirm the value and legitimacy of these identities. We argue that peace and security are often assumed to be dependent upon ‘the return’ of men to their presumed rightful places at the head of households and as economic providers. In turn, masculinity nostalgia emphasizes the ways in which yearnings for peace and security can be interwoven with yearnings for patriarchal gendered orders.; (AN 42370517)
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3.

Surveillance at sea: The transactional politics of border control in the Aegean by Dijstelbloem, Huub; van Reekum, Rogier; Schinkel, Willem. Security Dialogue, June 2017, Vol. 48 Issue: Number 3 p224-240, 17p; Abstract: The relationship between vision and action is a key element of both practices and conceptualizations of border surveillance in Europe. This article engages with what we call the ‘operative vision’ of surveillance at sea, specifically as performed by the border control apparatus in the Aegean. We analyse the political consequences of this operative vision by elaborating on three examples of fieldwork conducted in the Aegean and on the islands of Chios and Lesbos. One of the main aims is to bring the figure of the migrant back into the study of border technologies. By combining insights from science and technology studies with border, mobility and security studies, the article distinguishes between processes of intervention, mobilization and realization and emphasizes the role of migrants in their encounter with surveillance operations. Two claims are brought forward. First, engaging with recent scholarly work on the visual politics of border surveillance, we circumscribe an ongoing ‘transactional politics’. Second, the dynamic interplay between vision and action brings about a situation of ‘recalcitrance’, in which mobile objects and subjects of various kinds are drawn into securitized relations, for instance in encounters between coast guard boats and migrant boats at sea. Without reducing migrants to epiphenomena of those relations, this recalcitrance typifies the objects of surveillance as both relatable as well as resistant, particularly in the tensions between border control and search and rescue.; (AN 42370518)
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4.

Trouble in paradise: Contesting security in Bali by McDonald, Matt; Wilson, Lee. Security Dialogue, June 2017, Vol. 48 Issue: Number 3 p241-258, 18p; Abstract: The last decade in Indonesia has seen the emergence of localized militia groups. In Bali, these groups are now particularly prolific. Conventional wisdom in international relations thought is that these organizations constitute a threat to the authority of the state (its monopoly on the legitimate use of force) and may require national security measures to deal with them. Yet these organizations ultimately define their own role in terms of the provisionof security, claiming that they act to preserve or advance core values of their communities. In this sense, their security role with reference to the state is ambiguous: they often enjoy legitimacy at the local level and perform important security functions for their local communities, even while constituting an alternative site of security practice and challenging the (exclusive) security role of the Indonesian state. Drawing on ethnographic research, this article examines these actors as security agents and employs a framework of security contestation to make sense of the manner in which they engage with and redefine the provision of security in Bali. In this context, the emergence and practices of Balinese militia groups challenge the way we view non-state actors in the security space and, more generally, the way we conceive security agency in international relations.; (AN 42370515)
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5.

Theories, methods and practices – a longitudinal spatial analysis of the (de)securitization of the insurgency threat in Russia by Snetkov, Aglaya. Security Dialogue, June 2017, Vol. 48 Issue: Number 3 p259-275, 17p; Abstract: How do securitizing actors go about desecuritizing policy issues that have been securitized across multiple spatially bounded referent objects? Do such desecuritizations develop as a single or manifold process and with what political effect? And critically, how do we methodologically approach the study of such processes? These are pertinent questions that have been left underexamined in the (de)securitization literature. In seeking to fill this gap, this article makes two main points. First, it calls for a greater focus on the study of (de)securitizations that are constructed according to multiple spatially bounded referent objects, and on how these diverging strands of discourse and practice shape the overarching process. Second, it argues for a greater use of longitudinal methods of analysis as a better way to capture the evolutionary dynamics of desecuritization processes, which (re)constitute security policies and agendas. To illustrate these claims, the article considers the empirical case of Russia’s (de)securitization of insurgent threats since 2000 by tracing this process over a longitudinal period and across three spatial-referent objects, namely the local level: Chechnya; the sub-federal level: North Caucasus; and the national level: Russia.; (AN 42370516)
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5

Security Studies
Volume 26, no. 3, July 2017

Record

Results

1.

Does Oil Cause Ethnic War? Comparing Evidence from Process-tracing with Quantitative Results by Tang, Shiping; Xiong, Yihan; Li, Hui. Security Studies, July 2017, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 3 p359-390, 32p; Abstract: ABSTRACTThis article contributes both empirically and methodologically. Empirically, we seek to advance our understanding of an important puzzle: does oil cause ethnic war? Methodologically, we seek to identify more precisely the different weaknesses and strengths of the quantitative approach and case studies with process-tracing by explicitly comparing results from these two approaches on the same empirical question. We thus subject the statistical association between the ethnogeographical location of oil and the onset of ethnic war to test with process-tracing. Examining several pathway cases, we find that oil has rarely been a deep cause of ethnic war. Instead, the ethnogeographical location of oil either reignites dormant conflict that has deeper roots in ethnic resentment and hatred or intensifies ongoing conflict, mostly by facilitating the operation of two interconnected mechanisms. Our study echoes the notion that quantitative exercises alone often cannot establish specific causal mechanisms or how contextual factors impact the operation of these mechanisms, and it is precisely on these two key fronts that qualitative exercises possess critical advantages. Hence, quantitative methods and qualitative methods are complementary rather than competitive. Our study also yields important policy implications for preventing and managing ethnic conflict in countries with rich mineral resource.; (AN 41892951)
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2.

Military Cultures and Force Employment in Peace Operations by Ruffa, Chiara. Security Studies, July 2017, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 3 p391-422, 32p; Abstract: ABSTRACTAlthough hundreds of thousands of soldiers from different national contingents are deployed every year in multinational peace operations, no previous study has examined differences in peacekeeping practices along national lines. This paper first documents systematically differences in the way national contingents behave during peace operations in their respective area of operation. In a second step, it argues that these differences in behavior are largely consistent with the most important traits of each army's military culture. Based on extensive fieldwork conducted between 2007 and 2014 in Lebanon and Afghanistan, the paper shows how, within each mission, Italian soldiers prioritized humanitarian activities, while the French engaged in more patrolling activities, despite being both contingents deployed under similar conditions. These variations in behavior are consistent with the way French and Italian soldiers perceive the mission and context in which they deployed. And both the differences in behavior and perception are in line with the respective armies' military cultures. This paper contributes to the debate on the role of ideational factors in international politics and in particular to the ongoing discussion on strategic and military cultures.; (AN 41892950)
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3.

Unipolarity, Hegemony, and the New Peace by Fettweis, Christopher J.. Security Studies, July 2017, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 3 p423-451, 29p; Abstract: ABSTRACTDespite a few persistent, high-profile conflicts in the Middle East, the world is experiencing an era of unprecedented peace and stability. Many scholars have offered explanations for this “New Peace,” to borrow Steven Pinker's phrase, but few have devoted much time to the possibility that US hegemony has brought stability to the system. This paper examines the theoretical, empirical, and psychological foundations of the hegemonic-stability explanation for the decline in armed conflict. Those foundations are rather thin, as it turns out, and a review of relevant insights from political psychology suggests that unipolarity and stability are probably epiphenomenal. The New Peace can in all likelihood continue without US dominance and should persist long after unipolarity comes to an end.; (AN 41892952)
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4.

The Logic of Coercion in Cyberspace by Borghard, Erica D.; Lonergan, Shawn W.. Security Studies, July 2017, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 3 p452-481, 30p; Abstract: ABSTRACTWhat are the dynamics of coercion in cyberspace? Can states use cyber means as independent tools of coercion to influence the behavior of adversaries? This article critically assesses traditional coercion theory in light of cyberspace's emergence as a domain in which states use force, or its threat, to achieve political objectives. First, we review the core tenets of coercion theory and identify the requisites of successful coercion: clearly communicated threats; a cost–benefit calculus; credibility; and reassurance. We subsequently explore the extent to which each of these is feasible for or applicable to the cyber domain, highlighting how the dynamics of coercion in cyberspace mimic versus diverge from traditional domains of warfare. We demonstrate that cyber power alone has limited effectiveness as a tool of coercion, although it has significant utility when coupled with other elements of national power. Second, this article assesses the viability and effectiveness of six prominent warfighting strategies in the traditional coercion literature as applied to the cyber domain: attrition, denial, decapitation, intimidation, punishment, and risk. We conclude that, based on the current technological state of the field, states are only likely to achieve desired objectives employing attrition, denial, or decapitation strategies. Our analysis also has unique implications for the conduct of warfare in cyberspace. Perhaps counterintuitively, the obstacles to coercion that our analysis identifies may prompt states to reevaluate norms against targeting civilian infrastructure.; (AN 41892953)
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5.

Who Can Keep the Peace? Insurgent Organizational Control of Collective Violence by Worsnop, Alec. Security Studies, July 2017, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 3 p482-516, 35p; Abstract: ABSTRACTEvery armed organization seeks the ability to turn violence on and off by getting fighters to fight when ordered and to stop fighting when similarly ordered. This ability is a defining feature of what makes organized violence, in fact, organized. While state militaries develop clear hierarchies and disciplinary procedures to accomplish this goal, the complexity of civil war makes the task more difficult for insurgent groups. I argue that the leaders of insurgent organizations are able to turn violence on and off when they have deliberately established resource controlthrough the direct, and exclusive, distribution of resources to their followers and those followers are socially embedded, meaning that members are united by strong horizontal ties and group norms. In contrast to existing approaches, I argue that material and social endowments do not predetermine whether leaders can establish resource control or embeddedness. Further, laying out the precise organizational mechanisms that determine when organizations can turn violence on and off challenges the utility of conceptions such as “fragmentation” or “cohesion” for explaining insurgent behavior and conflict outcomes. I test the theory by examining variation in behavior over time in two organizations facing different structural contexts—Jaysh al-Mahdi in Iraq and the Viet Minh in Vietnam—and find strong support for my argument while casting doubt on existing explanations.; (AN 41892954)
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6.

Atomic Leverage: Compellence with Nuclear Latency by Volpe, Tristan A.. Security Studies, July 2017, Vol. 26 Issue: Number 3 p517-544, 28p; Abstract: ABSTRACTNuclear proliferation is not a binary outcome with uniform consequences, but instead spans a continuum of latent capacity to produce nuclear weapons. At various thresholds of technical development, some countries leverage nuclear latency to practice coercive diplomacy. How and when does nuclear technology provide a challenger with the most effective means to extract concessions in world politics? This article claims that compellence with nuclear latency puts a challenger on the horns of a credibility dilemma between demonstrating resolve and signaling restraint, and identifies a sweet spot for reaching an optimal bargain where the proliferation threat is credible while the assurance costs of revealing intent are low. Historical studies of South Korea, Japan, and North Korea validate this Goldilocks principle and find that it consistently reflects the ability to produce fissile material. Contrary to conventional wisdom about proliferation, nuclear technology generates political effects long before a country acquires nuclear weapons.; (AN 41892955)
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6

Small Wars and Insurgencies
Volume 28, no. 3, May 2017

Record

Results

1.

Back to the future – people’s war in the 21st century by Marks, Thomas A.; Rich, Paul B.. Small Wars and Insurgencies, May 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 3 p409-425, 17p; (AN 42199939)
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2.

Revolutionary leadership as necessary element in people’s war: Shining Path of Peru by Palmer, David Scott. Small Wars and Insurgencies, May 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 3 p426-450, 25p; Abstract: AbstractThough it is well understood that all internal upheaval within a polity is a consequence of agency interacting with structure, the importance of the former has perhaps become too pushed to the rear. In reality, as demonstrated by the case of Sendero Luminoso(Shining Path) in Peru, even cases which seem most determined by structural factors, in practice remain problematic, absent necessary revolutionary leadership. This leadership in turn, can make mistakes just as it guides successes.; (AN 42199938)
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3.

People’s war antithesis: Che Guevara and the mythology of Focismo by Rich, Paul B.. Small Wars and Insurgencies, May 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 3 p451-487, 37p; Abstract: AbstractThis paper re-evaluates the role and significance of Che Guevara and focismoin the strategic debate on insurgent warfare. It argues that Guevara’s approach to making revolution in Latin America and the Third World emerged out of his own earlier escapades as a restless tourist travelling through South and Central America in the early 1950s. Guevara’s life was one marked by a struggle to define an identity in a continent that he saw as dominated by the informal imperial power of the US. Focismocrystallised in the years after the Cuban Revolution in 1959 into an ideological concept supportive of the Castro regime’s claims to provide a distinctive new model of Third World revolution in opposition to those of the Soviet Union and China. Focismohas survived in the contemporary era as an approach that partly describes some modern terrorist and Jihadist movements in the Middle East.; (AN 42199940)
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4.

FARC, 1982–2002: criminal foundation for insurgent defeat by Marks, Thomas A.. Small Wars and Insurgencies, May 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 3 p488-523, 36p; Abstract: AbstractRecent controversy during the conclusion of peace talks has renewed discussion as to the nature of the effort by Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia, or FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia), to seize state power. FARC presents itself as an insurgency produced by societal imperfections and purports to speak for the marginalized and alienated of Colombia. Critics contend that FARC is a ruthless narcoterrorist organization that has targeted the people. In fact, FARC comes closer to the latter than the former, because its critical decision to privilege criminality for generation of means destroyed execution of a viable people’s war strategy. Ultimately, meansdevoured waysin such manner as to make endsunachievable. Criminality, though it made FARC perhaps the richest insurgent group in the world during its heyday, laid the foundation for its defeat by ceding legitimacy, and thus mass mobilization, to the democratic state.; (AN 42199943)
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5.

Was FARC militarily defeated? by Ospina Ovalle, Carlos Alberto. Small Wars and Insurgencies, May 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 3 p524-545, 22p; Abstract: AbstractThe concept of military victory has become opaque and quite different from the days of the industrial wars. Full military victory through total annihilation of the enemy has yielded to more complex ways of achieving political objectives. Eventually the understanding of the fact that the war is unwinnable on martial terms shifts insurgent strategy to one of survival, normally peace talks. It is this very shift of strategy, albeit the absence of insurgent annihilation, that constitutes the core of military victory for the government. Politicians and decision makers, if not military forces, blinded by the victory idea of the past, are unable to understand this reality. Hence, when peace talks are held, they are approached as the end of conflict rather than a shift to war by other means. This gives the upper hand to the insurgents.; (AN 42199942)
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6.

Critical ingredient: US aid to counterinsurgency in Colombia by Berrios, Carlos G.. Small Wars and Insurgencies, May 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 3 p546-575, 30p; Abstract: AbstractIn assisting states facing insurgencies, few subjects are more vital than understanding the manner in which external aid can be applied in a sustainable manner. Colombia, touted by proponents as a case study for astute application of external reinforcement for democracy, is just as often held up by critics as an illustration of the misplaced priorities of the US. No part of the critique is more prevalent than assertions concerning the nature of US military assistance. American aid to counterinsurgency filled particular capacity gaps and enhanced capabilities that already existed. These were possible due to the Colombian ability to absorb input.; (AN 42199941)
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7.

A double-edged sword: the people’s uprising in Ghazni, Afghanistan by Dearing, Matthew P.. Small Wars and Insurgencies, May 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 3 p576-608, 33p; Abstract: AbstractIn the recent era of state formation in Afghanistan, hundreds of small popular movements rebelled against the Taliban throughout the country. One in particular stands out – the Andar Uprising in the spring of 2012 gave a compelling case of local vigilantism in an area ripe with historic grievances and narratives of community defense dating back to the anti-Soviet jihad. This case is compelling as it shows one faction of the movement engaging in protective paramilitary behavior over the civilian population, while the other faction engages in predatory behavior. Controlling processes, incentives structures, and narratives were all factors correlating to the rise of a popular anti-Taliban resistance in Andar District that battled the Taliban and perceived oppression in their district. When patrons and the community engaged in complementary governance over the paramilitary group, in this case through the Afghan Local Police (ALP), paramilitary behavior was protective of the civilian population. However, when patrons and communities failed to provide complementary governance, as the case of the remaining Uprising force after ALP institutionalization, the paramilitaries engaged in predation on the local population.; (AN 42199945)
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8.

The North Caucasus: from mass mobilization to international terrorism by Pokalova, Elena. Small Wars and Insurgencies, May 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 3 p609-628, 20p; Abstract: AbstractInsurgencies have proven to be highly adaptive movements that exploit their environments and change and mutate in order to survive. States and international actors have long grappled with ways to thwart such adaptations. In this respect, disengagement initiatives that offer insurgents opportunities for alternative livelihood seem to present a viable mechanism for weakening insurgencies. Analyzing the case of the North Caucasus insurgency, this article examines the interrelation between such variables as insurgent crises, government disengagement programs, and foreign attempts to co-opt the insurgency. It is argued that disengagement programs implemented during the second Chechen conflict prevented the insurgent command from pledging allegiance to Al-Qaeda because insurgents had to preserve their local orientation to compete for their bases of support. In 2014, however, the North Caucasus insurgents pledged allegiance to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria as no viable disengagement opportunities existed at the time and their only route for survival was to join a global insurgency.; (AN 42199944)
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9.

Bolivia, a new model insurgency for the 21st century: from Mao back to Lenin by Spencer, David E.; Acha Melgar, Hugo. Small Wars and Insurgencies, May 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 3 p629-660, 32p; Abstract: AbstractIn Bolivia, a brilliantly executed insurgency was carried out between 1995 and 2005, so much so that few perceived it as such. Its most important characteristic was its correct evaluation of the relative correlation of forces and application of the right combination of all forms of struggle. This was possible because of its pragmatism. Though not bound by ideological dogmatism, it nonetheless displayed a deep understanding of insurgency and revolutionary theory. This allowed adaptation and evolution in a changing context. The main form of struggle was not military violence, although it was not absent, but rather violent social protest funded by drug trafficking proceeds. The strategy thus neutralized traditional counterinsurgency models, because it made it difficult to apply coercive force as the enemy was not clearly identifiable. Its success in Bolivia means that the emergence of a new model of insurgency, one still built upon the popular mobilization of people’s war but more attuned to new global realities, is a reality.; (AN 42199947)
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10.

The Sino-Indian War of 1962: New Perspectives by Stone, David R.. Small Wars and Insurgencies, May 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 3 p661-662, 2p; (AN 42199946)
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11.

Missionaries of modernity. Advisory missions and the struggle for hegemony in Afghanistan and beyond by Marshall, Alex. Small Wars and Insurgencies, May 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 3 p662-665, 4p; (AN 42199949)
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12.

Notes on Contributors Small Wars and Insurgencies, May 2017, Vol. 28 Issue: Number 3 p666-667, 2p; (AN 42199948)
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7

Southeast European and Black Sea Studies
Volume 17, no. 2, April 2017

Record

Results

1.

Introduction – diverse perspectives on Jewish life in Southeast Europe: the Holocaust and beyond by Králová, Kateřina. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, April 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 2 p155-163, 9p; (AN 42288154)
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2.

Defining inter-communality between documents, tradition and collective memory: Jewish and non-Jewish capital and labor in early twentieth century Rhodes by Guidi, Andreas. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, April 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 2 p165-180, 16p; Abstract: AbstractThis article deals with the relations between Jews and Non-Jews, especially Greeks, in late and post-Ottoman Rhodes. In the first part, I show that an understanding of the dimension of cosmopolitan Ottoman port cities is necessary for inquiring into the societal dynamics of the post-imperial local context. Secondly, I describe the obstacles for a pluralistic and inter-confessional historiography based on the current trends pursued by Greek and Jewish authors. The economic aspect of the coexistence between Greeks and Jews being a recurrent, yet very generalized and superficial motive in those works, I inquire into relations of individuals in the capital and labour market of Rhodes. In this empirical section, I draw from archival sources to show that inter-communality was far from being an exceptional, a-normal occurrence in different professions, from moneylending to prostitution. Instead, it represented a persistent factor of cooperation, interdependence and occasional conflict. By downplaying any rigid narrative of confessional segregation and coherence, I argue that ‘groupist’ reading of the history of Rhodes in the twentieth century should be challenged by further efforts towards a polyphonic and inclusive narrative more focused on the social actors.; (AN 42288155)
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3.

Antisemitism as political theology in Greece and its impact on Greek Jewry, 1967–1979 by Blümel, Tobias. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, April 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 2 p181-202, 22p; Abstract: AbstractGreece, especially after 1945, remains a terra incognita of antisemitism research. This is not only a scholarly problem but also affects contemporary Greek judicature, which in 2009 and 2010 – during the controversial trial against Konstantinos A. Plevris, the so-called intellectual head of contemporary Greek Nazism – determined Holocaust denial, ariosophic fantasies of racial superiority and the public demand for the extinction of European Jewry to fall under the definition of ‘freedom of the arts, science and research.’ Some of the central historical sources the Greek courts accepted to be allegedly authentic enough to scientifically prove the ‘Jew-Zionists’ [evraiosionistes, T.B.] aspirations to world power’ were excerpts from the book of a fanatic nineteenth-century blood-libel author in Russia along with the internationally known antisemitic forgery, The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. The following article will argue that the origin of antisemitism in Greece is a phenomenon at the intersection of pre-Enlightenment and modernity, namely founded upon an ideological framework of nation, religion and race.; (AN 42288158)
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4.

Voices from the ghetto of Thessaloniki: mother–son correspondence as a source of Jewish everyday life under persecution by Saltiel, Leon. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, April 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 2 p203-222, 20p; Abstract: AbstractThe article discusses the content of 52 letters written by three different Jewish mothers living in the ghetto of Thessaloniki and sent to their sons, all residing in Athens, during the Second World War. This unique find can shed light on the lives of ordinary Jewish citizens in the ghetto of Thessaloniki, never before known in such a detail. The information presented in these letters is invaluable. These eyewitness accounts describe the general situation and the emotions right before and during the deportations, which is when these letters stop. Other than narrating some of the major events of this period, the reader learns details ranging from family and inter-communal relations, to the daily nutrition, diseases and the price of different goods. Last but not least, they provide a window into the daily life during the German occupation in Thessaloniki, free from hindsight.; (AN 42288157)
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5.

From salvation to Alya: the Bulgarian Jews and Bulgarian-Israeli relations (1948–1990) by Marinova-Christidi, Rumyana. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, April 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 2 p223-244, 22p; Abstract: AbstractThe basic aim of the present paper is to provide a historical overview of Bulgarian–Israeli relations from 1948 to 1990 (when diplomatic relations were re-established following their break off in 1967), and of Bulgarian state policy towards Jews in the country during the Second World War and the post-war Socialist period. The paper analyses the variety of factors that have affected that ‘triangular relationship’, such as the positive historical legacy of Bulgarian–Jewish relations that contributed to the salvation of Bulgarian Jews during the Holocaust, and the role and place of Bulgaria and Israel in the cold war confrontation that dominated international politics from the end of the 1940s to 1989.; (AN 42288156)
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6.

Rebuilding the community: the Federation of Jewish Communities and American Jewish humanitarian aid in Yugoslavia, 1944–1952 by Kerenji, Emil. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, April 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 2 p245-262, 18p; Abstract: AbstractThis article recounts the implications of American Jewish aid for rebuilding the Jewish communities of Yugoslavia in the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust. By focusing on the founding and the activities of the Autonomous Relief Committee (ARC), which channelled aid provided by the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC), the article argues that it was the power that ARC assumed, of deciding on funding priorities and being in close proximity to the new Yugoslav communist regime, that allowed it to shape the outlook of post-Holocaust Jewishness in Yugoslavia. The article is based primarily on previously unexamined sources from the Federation of Jewish Communities of Yugoslavia and JDC, and sheds new light on the dynamic period of negotiation of the new normative Jewish identity in the aftermath of the Holocaust.; (AN 42288161)
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7.

‘Being traitors’: post-war Greece in the experience of Jewish partisans by Králová, Kateřina. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, April 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 2 p263-280, 18p; Abstract: AbstractAs a result of political developments, silence about Jewish resistance in post-war Greece persisted for decades. In my article, I focus on the post-war fate of Jewish partisans in the context of the Greek Civil War and the emerging East–West conflict. After liberation, many partisans in Greece were stigmatized and even tried as communists. In the 1980s, when Athens shifted towards socialism, Jewish survivors began to speak up regarding their involvement in the left-leaning resistance (EAM/ELAS). Based on archival research and oral testimonies, I explore how former Jewish partisans reflected on their EAM/ELAS participation, in which way they came to terms with the imminence of post-war persecution and which attitudes were applied in the case of arrests. In this way, this study may contribute not only to a better understanding of post-the First World War Greece but also towards identity politics and memory studies in general.; (AN 42288160)
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8.

Memorialization of the Holocaust in Transylvania during the early post-war period by Tibori-Szabó, Zoltán. Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, April 2017, Vol. 17 Issue: Number 2 p281-299, 19p; Abstract: AbstractDetails of the fate of the Jewish community in Northern Transylvania, under Hungarian state administration after 1940, were of common knowledge already by the last months of the Second World War. Consequently, wide circles of the local population could have been familiar with its nature and events. However, only the top members of the political and church elites were aware about the tragedy of the Transylvanian Jews after their deportation. Between 1945 and 1949, the Transylvanian media presented several times the most important facts of the horrors of the Holocaust. Simultaneously, the surviving members of the annihilated Northern Transylvanian Jewish communities did everything in their power to immortalize the memory of the tragedy in literary and art works. During the decades of communist consolidation, when all areas of social life, the facts of the Holocaust included, fell under the reign of silence, these early creations of Holocaust memorialization played an important role in keeping the memory of the genocide alive and constantly directing the attention of young generations upon the sinister legacy of Nazism and fascism.; (AN 42288159)
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8

Strategic Analysis
Volume 41, no. 4, July 2017

Record

Results

1.

Editors’ Introduction by Prasad, Jayant; Rajiv, S. Samuel C.. Strategic Analysis, July 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 4 p311-313, 3p; (AN 42586238)
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2.

India–Israel: Retrospective and Prospective by Gharekhan, Chinmaya R.. Strategic Analysis, July 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 4 p314-324, 11p; (AN 42586240)
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3.

A Perspective on India–Israel Defence and Security Ties by Browne, N. A. K.. Strategic Analysis, July 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 4 p325-335, 11p; (AN 42586239)
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4.

India–Israel Defence Engagement: Land Forces’ Cooperation by Deb, Alok. Strategic Analysis, July 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 4 p336-340, 5p; (AN 42586241)
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5.

India–Israel Defence Engagement: A Naval Perspective by Gopal, Prakash. Strategic Analysis, July 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 4 p341-347, 7p; (AN 42586242)
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6.

India–Israel: The View from West Asia by Singh, Sanjay. Strategic Analysis, July 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 4 p348-354, 7p; (AN 42586243)
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7.

Redefining ‘Strategic’ Cooperation by Kumaraswamy, P. R.. Strategic Analysis, July 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 4 p355-368, 14p; Abstract: AbstractA quarter century after normalisation of relations, India and Israel have shown considerable maturity in handling bilateral relations and dexterity in managing their occasional differing worldviews. Relations have weathered political changes within India as well as periodic upheavals in West Asia and the stalemate in the Israeli-Palestinian negotiations. Military-security cooperation played a pivotal role in carrying forward relations even when political contacts were minimal, as was the case during the decade-long United Progressive Alliance (UPA) rule. A crucial aspect of bilateral relations has been Israel’s ability to utilise the federal system in India to its advantage by actively engaging with various state governments. As a result, cooperation in the fields of agriculture and water management, among others, has emerged as the principal tool in the promotion of Indo-Israeli relations. Besides boosting economic ties, this strategy is also aimed at providing and consolidating the support base in India beyond the urban elites.; (AN 42586245)
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8.

Israel and India: Looking Back and Ahead by Inbar, Efraim. Strategic Analysis, July 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 4 p369-383, 15p; Abstract: AbstractThe article begins by reviewing the Zionist attempts to turn India into a friend. The Zionist movement viewed India as important almost from its formation. Attitudes shaping behaviour prior to the formation of both the states are assessed, as is the icy relationship that prevailed between the two states prior to January 1992. The factors that brought about the change in the relationship to ambassadorial status are analysed, along with the two countries’ burgeoning strategic partnership. Finally, a few thoughts are offered concerning the future of the relationship.; (AN 42586246)
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9.

Assessing US Influence over India–Israel Relations: A Difficult Equation to Balance? by Blarel, Nicolas. Strategic Analysis, July 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 4 p384-400, 17p; Abstract: AbstractAs India’s Israel policy evolved over time, the US involvement in this bilateral relationship has been constant, albeit neither consistent nor direct. Breaking with traditional state-centric approaches, this article focuses on the key role played in shaping the nature of India–Israel ties by non-state and sub-state actors such as specific political personalities, for example Congressmen Emmanuel Celler in the 1940s and Stephen Solarz in the 1980s, as well as of pro-Israel interest groups based in the US, like the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) and the American Jewish Committee (AJC). The article shows that the US factor in India–Israel relations has evolved over time depending on the personalities, political constellations in power in India and regional developments in West Asia. Finally, while India, Israel and US interests seem to have converged at some crucial junctures, the article argues that their policies and strategies have rarely aligned over the long term.; (AN 42586244)
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10.

India–Israel Defence Trade: Issues and Challenges by Cowshish, Amit. Strategic Analysis, July 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 4 p401-412, 12p; Abstract: AbstractTo achieve strategically critical self-reliance in defence production, there needs to be a greater focus on co-development, co-production projects with important partners like Israel, with an essential emphasis on exports to third countries. For the full realisation of the potential of the India–Israel defence partnership, India on its part needs to strengthen elements of its procurement processes—including the proper implementation of laid down policies. Further, it needs to put forward a procurement ‘policy’ as distinct from a procurement ‘procedure’, ensure greater clarity and transparency about the future procurement needs of the armed forces and align defence plans with realistic assessments of the financial resources likely to be made available for executing those plans.; (AN 42586247)
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11.

Israel–China Ties at 25: The Limited Partnership by Rajiv, S. Samuel C.. Strategic Analysis, July 2017, Vol. 41 Issue: Number 4 p413-431, 19p; Abstract: AbstractIsrael–China bilateral ties have witnessed significant growth since the establishment of full diplomatic relations in January, 1992. Both countries are currently investing their energies in realising the full potential of their on-going partnership in the innovation economy. Growing tourist linkages are another facet of the burgeoning relationship. While China has ‘comprehensive strategic partnerships’ with more than 30 countries, including with those in Israel’s neighbourhood, like Egypt and Iran, the term ‘strategic’ is conspicuously absent in describing the nature of the bilateral ties by either Israel or China. The relationship is instead described as a ‘comprehensive innovation partnership’. This article shows that three limiting factors continue to cast a shadow on the China–Israel partnership. These are: the conundrum of defence trade and security ties; China’s long-standing support of the Palestinian cause in international forums, like the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) and UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC)—multilateral bodies whose work is routinely described as a ‘joke’ and a ‘circus’ by Israel’s top leadership; and China’s growing stakes with the wider West Asia region, animated by arms, energy and infrastructure deals.; (AN 42586248)
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9

Studies in Conflict and Terrorism
Volume 40, no. 8, August 2017

Record

Results

1.

Old Becomes New Again: Kidnappings by Daesh and Other Salafi-Jihadistsin the Twenty-First Century by Cragin, R. Kim; Padilla, Phillip. Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, August 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 8 p665-683, 19p; Abstract: ABSTRACTDaesh fighters have taken hostage over 100 foreigners in Syria, Iraq, and elsewhere since 2012. The kidnappings drew international attention in August 2014, when American journalist James Foley was decapitated and a video of his death was posted online. But the pattern of kidnappings and gruesome videos distributed by violent Salafi-jihadistsextends back over a decade to the killing of Daniel Pearl in 2002. This article traces shifts in the strategic rationale of Al Qaeda and Daesh for beheading Western hostages. It argues that terrorists altered their calculations on foreign hostages beginning in 2012 and U.S. counterterrorism policy does not take these shifts into account.; (AN 42587207)
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2.

The Role of Civil Wars and Elections in Inducing Political Assassinations by Perliger, Arie. Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, August 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 8 p684-700, 17p; Abstract: ABSTRACTPolitical assassinations can dramatically impact political and social dynamics, especially in times of violent political conflicts or electoral competition. The current study explores if and how specific social and political events facilitate the occurrence of political assassinations. After an examination of the logic of political assassinations, a theoretical framework is presented, which explains the role of civil wars and electoral processes as facilitators of different types of political assassinations. The theory is tested via a dataset of political assassinations worldwide between the years 1946–2013. The findings confirm that different sets of structural and contextual factors facilitate assassinations against heads of state, legislators, and leaders of opposition movements/parties. In addition, the findings illustrate the tendency of elections, especially in nonliberal settings and in polarized societies, to facilitate political assassinations rather than to calm the political environment. In contrast, civil wars have a more limited impact on the probability of assassinations, and their intensity and endurance mainly enhance the risk of assassinations of legislators.; (AN 42587210)
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3.

Schools and Terrorism: Global Trends, Impacts, and Lessons for Resilience by Petkova, Elisaveta P.; Martinez, Stephanie; Schlegelmilch, Jeffrey; Redlener, Irwin. Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, August 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 8 p701-711, 11p; Abstract: ABSTRACTThis study characterizes trends in the frequency and characteristics of terrorist attacks in child-serving educational institutions around the world, examining the specific vulnerabilies of children and schools with regard to terrorist violence, as well as the various impacts that violence has on children, communities, and societies. Following the analysis of available data on terrorist attacks against educational institutions, vulnerabilities, and impacts, the study concludes with a discussion of what still needs to be understood in the intersection of child vulnerability and terrorism, and provides recommendations for improving resilience to terrorist attacks against child-serving educational institutions.; (AN 42587208)
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4.

The Rise and Transformation of the Radical Right Movement in Denmark, 1980–2015 by Karpantschof, René; Mikkelsen, Flemming. Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, August 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 8 p712-730, 19p; Abstract: ABSTRACTThis article examines the rise and subsequent development and transformation of the new radical right movement in Denmark from 1980–2015. The Danish radical right emerged from xenophobic subcultures as a reaction to increasing immigration during the 1980s and evolved into a social movement of nationalist associations, militant skinheads, and neo-Nazis that attempted to conquer the streets. This attempt was met by an antiracist countermovement, which built up a coalition of left-wing militants and moderate political organizations that put a temporary end to the radical right as a social movement during the second half of the 1990s. However, from 2001 national and international circumstances offered new opportunities for the Danish radical right both in the streets and as a parliamentary voice.; (AN 42587209)
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10

Survival
Volume 59, no. 3, May 2017

Record

Results

1.

Was the Rise of ISIS Inevitable? by Brands, Hal; Feaver, Peter. Survival, May 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 3 p7-54, 48p; Abstract: The most fateful American choice in the rise of ISIS was also the oldest one: the 2003 decision to invade Iraq, followed by the mismanagement of the occupation.; (AN 41939852)
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2.

The End of a Caliphate by Dobbins, James; Jones, Seth G.. Survival, May 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 3 p55-72, 18p; Abstract: It is not clear that the United States will commit to the long-term efforts needed to prevail against the Islamic State’s affiliates, and to ensure the organisation does not re-emerge in Iraq and Syria.; (AN 41939853)
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3.

An Area-Access Strategy for NATO by Pothier, Fabrice. Survival, May 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 3 p73-80, 8p; Abstract: Without a credible plan for reinforcement, the Alliance’s much-celebrated eastern tripwires could rapidly become sitting ducks.; (AN 41939858)
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4.

Trump’s Missing Asia Strategy by Huxley, Tim; Schreer, Benjamin. Survival, May 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 3 p81-89, 9p; Abstract: Mixed messaging and the doctrine of ‘America First’ are generating scepticism and anxiety among America’s allies and partners in the Asia-Pacific.; (AN 41939854)
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5.

Noteworthy Survival, May 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 3 p90-92, 3p; (AN 41939859)
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6.

The Benefits of Hindsight: Historical Research and Political Accountability by Freedman, Lawrence. Survival, May 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 3 p93-110, 18p; Abstract: The only fair test when evaluating policymakers’ judgements is to ask whether a decision was reasonable given what was known at the time.; (AN 41939861)
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7.

Brief Notices Survival, May 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 3 pe1-e10, 10p; (AN 41939864)
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8.

Does Brexit Threaten Peace in Northern Ireland? by Stevenson, Jonathan. Survival, May 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 3 p111-128, 18p; Abstract: The United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union may have hastened the coming of a united Ireland.; (AN 41939860)
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9.

Now for the Hard Part: NATO’s Strategic Adaptation to Russia by Ringsmose, Jens; Rynning, Sten. Survival, May 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 3 p129-146, 18p; Abstract: The Alliance’s success in adapting its deterrence posture has brought into focus a range of more complex challenges.; (AN 41939868)
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10.

Deterrence from the Ground Up: Understanding NATO’s Enhanced Forward Presence by Zapfe, Martin. Survival, May 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 3 p147-160, 14p; Abstract: NATO’s deterrence strategy must take into account the fundamentally political nature of the Russian threat.; (AN 41939866)
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11.

UN Peace Operations and the Use of Military Force by Rudolf, Peter. Survival, May 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 3 p161-182, 22p; Abstract: The gap between traditional peacekeeping principles and the realities of contemporary operations is becoming increasingly apparent.; (AN 41939867)
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12.

Book Reviews by Jones, Erik; Crandall, Russell; Mazo, Jeffrey. Survival, May 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 3 p183-204, 22p; (AN 41939865)
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13.

Prohibition and Its Discontents by Williams, Heather. Survival, May 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 3 p205-208, 4p; Abstract: States and civil-society groups pursuing a ban on nuclear weapons do not all share the same motivations.; (AN 41939862)
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14.

The Interpreters by Pedersen, Asger. Survival, May 2017, Vol. 59 Issue: Number 3 p209-214, 6p; Abstract: The treatment of local civilians formerly employed by foreign militaries in Afghanistan is a source of shame for the soldiers with whom they served.; (AN 41939863)
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11

Terrorism and Political Violence
Volume 29, no. 4, July 2017

Record

Results

1.

Retaliation in Rebellion: The Missing Link to Explaining Insurgent Violence in Dagestan by Ratelle, Jean-François; Souleimanov, Emil Aslan. Terrorism and Political Violence, July 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 4 p573-592, 20p; Abstract: This article posits that the remnants of archaic sociocultural norms, particularly the honour-imposed custom of retaliation, play a crucial role in the process of insurgent engagement in Russia's autonomous republic of Dagestan. Through a series of interviews with former insurgents, this study outlines two retaliation-centred mechanisms: “individual retaliation” and “spiritual retaliation” in order to explain the microcosm of motives behind insurgent activity in Dagestan. In doing so, this study problematizes the role of Salafi/Jihadist ideology as the main impetus for insurgent violence. Reversing the traditional causal link between violence and religion, this study also demonstrates that the development of Jihadist ideology is a by-product of insurgent mobilization rather than its cause.; (AN 42042068)
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2.

Was Idi Amin's Government a Terrorist Regime? by Leonard Boyle, Emma. Terrorism and Political Violence, July 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 4 p593-609, 17p; Abstract: What does state terrorism look like? How do we distinguish it from other forms of mass state violence, such as repression or genocide? Based on the developing literature on state terrorism, this study presents three expectations that violence perpetrated by the state should meet if it is to be classified as state terrorism: these are (a) that the violence is perpetrated by agents of the state, (b) that the violence is visible, and (c) that state terrorism focused against a state's own citizens will be carried out by an autocratic, personalistic regime. Drawing substantially on a series of primary sources, this study demonstrates that Idi Amin's regime in Uganda from 1971 to 1979 did engage in state terrorism against its own citizens.; (AN 42042069)
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3.

Theorizing the Expansion of the Boko Haram Insurgency in Nigeria by Weeraratne, Suranjan. Terrorism and Political Violence, July 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 4 p610-634, 25p; Abstract: This research investigates the dramatic expansion of the Boko Haram insurgency in Nigeria in the last few years. Militant activity has expanded in terms of frequency and severity of attacks, geographic scope, target selection, and strategies used. The evolution of the group and the trajectory of violence are best explained through four overlapping theoretical strands. These include the growing fragmentation of the movement, development of strategic ties with Al Qaeda affiliates, strong-armed counterterrorism operations that further radicalized the movement, and exploitation of the porous border area that separates Nigeria from its northern neighbors.; (AN 42042071)
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4.

Bosnia on the Border? Republican Violence in Northern Ireland During the 1920s and 1970s by Lewis, Matthew; McDaid, Shaun. Terrorism and Political Violence, July 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 4 p635-655, 21p; Abstract: Unionist politicians have argued that Republican political violence on the Irish border, during both the partition of Ireland and more recent Northern Ireland conflict, constituted ethnic cleansing and genocide against the Protestant/Unionist community in those areas. These views have been bolstered by an increasingly ambivalent scholarly literature that has failed to adequately question the accuracy of these claims. This article interrogates the ethnic cleansing/genocide narrative by analysing Republican violence during the 1920s and the 1970s. Drawing from a wide range of theoretical literature and archival sources, it demonstrates that Republican violence fell far short of either ethnic cleansing or genocide, (in part) as a result of the perpetrators’ self-imposed ideological constraints. It also defines a new interpretive concept for the study of violence: functional sectarianism. This concept is designed to move scholarly discussion of political and sectarian violence beyond the highly politicised and moral cul-de-sacs that have heretofore characterised the debate, and has implications for our understanding of political violence beyond Ireland.; (AN 42042072)
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5.

How Does Violence Threaten the State? Four Narratives on Piracy by Shirk, Mark. Terrorism and Political Violence, July 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 4 p656-673, 18p; Abstract: Violence characterized by similar actions, actor motivations, group structures, or level of damage still poses qualitatively distinct genera of threats to states. For instance, “terrorism” can threaten a particular state, be used by a state, or threaten the entire state system. Building on the threat construction literature, this study argues that threat is best understood through narratives on the relationship between violence and the boundary-producing practices that construct the state. Four ideal-typical basic narratives on this relationship are produced—entrant, resource, revisionist, and criminal. Each narrative is then demonstrated by looking at how it was used in a historical case of piracy. The action (piracy as raiding at sea) is held constant while the threat in each varies with the narrative. Understanding how threat is narratively constructed can help us to understand particular historical episodes of violence and state responses to them.; (AN 42042073)
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6.

Tailoring Strategies According to Ever-Changing Dynamics: The Evolving Image of the Kurdish Diaspora in Germany by Baser, Bahar. Terrorism and Political Violence, July 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 4 p674-691, 18p; Abstract: Germany might be considered as the European country that has suffered the most from the spatial diffusion of Turkey's internal conflicts. It has received the highest number of Kurdish migrants in Europe and it became the core of Kurdish mobilization in transnational space. Germany's approach to the Kurdish Question on its own soil—combined with the strategies that the Kurdish activists used—determined the scope of opportunity structures for the mobilization of the Kurdish movement. This article explains how Kurdish activism has come to be perceived in Germany, and analyzes the German political environment by focusing on the criminalization and stigmatization of the Kurdish movement, especially during the 1990s. It then describes the discursive shift and change in framing strategies that the Kurdish diaspora experienced after the capture of the the Kurdistan Workers' Party's (PKK) leader in 1999. Lastly, it touches upon the recent developments in the Middle East, especially in Kobane, and their impact on the image of the Kurdish movement. The article is based on extensive fieldwork in Germany and includes testimonies of Kurdish diaspora activists, with a focus on their own perceptions about their situation and how they respond to securitization policies in the host country.; (AN 42042070)
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7.

The Golden Age? What the 100 Most Cited Articles in Terrorism Studies Tell Us by Silke, Andrew; Schmidt-Petersen, Jennifer. Terrorism and Political Violence, July 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 4 p692-712, 21p; Abstract: In a context where widespread failings in the nature of terrorism research are well recognised—yet where the quantity of work is still enormous—is it possible to fairly assess whether the field is progressing or if it has become mired in mediocre research? Citation analysis is widely used to reveal the evolution and extent of progress in fields of study and to provide valuable insight into major trends and achievements. This study identifies and analyses the current 100 most cited journal articles in terrorism studies. A search was performed using Google Scholar for peer-reviewed journal articles on subjects related to terrorism and counter-terrorism. The most cited articles were published across sixty-two journals, which reflected the interdisciplinary nature of terrorism studies. Compared to other articles, the most cited articles were more likely to be the result of collaborative research and were also more likely to provide new data. Sixty-three of the top 100 articles have been published since 2001. The findings are discussed in relation to the evolution of terrorism research and current debates on progress in the field.; (AN 42042075)
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8.

Adversary Group Decision-Making Regarding Choice of Attack Methods: Expecting the Unexpected by Knight, Sarah E.; Keane, Carys; Murphy, Amy. Terrorism and Political Violence, July 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 4 p713-734, 22p; Abstract: Anticipating whether an adversary group will continue to use their usual (“conventional”), expected attack methods is important for military and counterterrorism practitioners tasked with protecting the security of others. Conventional attack methods are by their nature easier to plan and prepare for whilst “innovative” methods may take those responsible for security and counterterrorism by surprise and, as such, may have more impact and more serious consequences. The present study aimed to develop understanding of how, when, and why adversary groups might decide to use conventional attack methods or opt to do something innovative instead. A literature review was conducted and findings were applied to develop a thorough understanding of the decision-making process that underlies an adversary group's choice of attack method. Identified are three stages preceding the execution of an attack: a) “strategic direction”; b) “incubation”; and c) “planning and preparation,” plus “overarching” and “contextual” factors that can influence the process at each stage. It is suggested that it is these factors and how they influence decision-making that result in innovative methods being used to execute an attack, or convention prevailing. Findings can aid practitioners and policy-makers in counterterrorism, security, and law enforcement, to support their understanding, evaluation, and countering of current and future threats.; (AN 42042076)
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9.

The Secret Agent, International Policing, and Anarchist Terrorism: 1900–1914 by Jensen, Richard Bach. Terrorism and Political Violence, July 2017, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 4 p735-771, 37p; Abstract: An unprecedented expansion of global anti-terrorist policing took place after 1900, although the security forces projected outside their borders by Russia, Italy, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Spain, and Argentina displayed an enormous diversity in size and effectiveness. Crucial to successful policing was how these countries improved their intelligence through recruiting and handling informers, maintained secrecy and good relations with local police, and handled the media. The British approach to anarchist control was arguably the most successful. Italian international policing was the most far-reaching, while the United States long remained the world's most under-policed large country. On examination, the view that anti-anarchist policing was a case of conservative imperial regimes versus the Western democracies loses validity. During this period, a general trend saw the transfer of anarchist surveillance from the hands of diplomats into those of interior ministry officials and the police, all in the name of greater centralization, professionalization, and efficiency.; (AN 42042074)
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12

Washington Quarterly
Volume 40, no. 2, April 2017

Record

Results

1.

The World of Webcraft: Using Networks Against Shadow Finance by Slaughter, Anne-Marie; LaForge, Gordon. The Washington Quarterly, April 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 2 p7-28, 22p; (AN 42550034)
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2.

Preserving the Post-War Order by Mazarr, Michael J.. The Washington Quarterly, April 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 2 p29-49, 21p; (AN 42550039)
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3.

“On The Brink”—Really? Revisiting Nuclear Close Calls Since 1945 by Tertrais, Bruno. The Washington Quarterly, April 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 2 p51-66, 16p; (AN 42550040)
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4.

Fight or Flight: How to Avoid a Forever War against Jihadists by Byman, Daniel; McCants, Will. The Washington Quarterly, April 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 2 p67-77, 11p; (AN 42550036)
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5.

The Brutal Politics of China's Economic Overhaul: What Xi Can Learn from FDR by Heath, Timothy R.. The Washington Quarterly, April 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 2 p79-93, 15p; (AN 42550035)
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6.

The Cyclical Politics of Counterterrorism by Klein, Adam I.. The Washington Quarterly, April 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 2 p95-111, 17p; (AN 42550038)
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7.

The Israeli Odyssey toward its National Cyber Security Strategy by Adamsky, Dmitry (Dima). The Washington Quarterly, April 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 2 p113-127, 15p; (AN 42550037)
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8.

Has Modi Truly Changed India's Foreign Policy? by Ganguly, Sumit. The Washington Quarterly, April 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 2 p131-143, 13p; (AN 42550041)
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9.

Beyond India’s Quest for a Neoliberal Order by Rej, Abhijnan. The Washington Quarterly, April 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 2 p145-161, 17p; (AN 42550043)
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10.

India's Slow Emergence as a Regional Security Actor by Tarapore, Arzan. The Washington Quarterly, April 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 2 p163-178, 16p; (AN 42550042)
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13

West European Politics
Volume 40, no. 5, September 2017

Record

Results

1.

National interest organisations in EU policy-making by Eising, Rainer; Rasch, Daniel; Rozbicka, Patrycja. West European Politics, September 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 5 p939-956, 18p; Abstract: AbstractComparative and EU interest group studies are marked by a progression towards theory-driven, large-Nempirical studies in the past 20 years. With the study of national interest organisations in EU policy-making, this special issue puts centre stage a theoretically and empirically neglected topic in this research field. The individual contributions include interest group characteristics, institutional contexts as well as issue contexts as explanatory factors in their empirical analyses of multilevel interest representation. They present novel developments in the study of political alignments among interest groups and political institutions, the Europeanisation of domestic interest organisations, and the question of bias in interest group populations. Thereby, they not only contribute to the comparative study of interest groups, but also to the analysis of policy-making, multilevel governance, and political representation in the EU.; (AN 42199902)
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2.

Who says what to whom? Alignments and arguments in EU policy-making by Eising, Rainer; Rasch, Daniel; Rozbicka, Patrycja; Fink-Hafner, Danica; Hafner-Fink, Mitja; Novak, Meta. West European Politics, September 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 5 p957-980, 24p; Abstract: AbstractIn the EU multilevel polity, domestic interest groups seek to shape EU legislation by accessing both national and EU institutions. Previous studies indicated that institutional and issue contexts as well as organisational characteristics shape their strategies of interest representation. However, we know much less about how alignments and arguments impact on their participation in EU and national policy consultations. Addressing this gap, we investigate the lobbying strategies of almost 2900 national interest organisations from five member states (Germany, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Sweden, and the United Kingdom) on 20 EU directive proposals also bringing a new empirical scope to the study of multilevel interest representation. The findings indicate that alignments and arguments shape the participation of domestic interest groups in consultations on EU policies. We infer from our study that some general predictions of interest group behaviour are overstretched and outline four major variations of interest representation routines.; (AN 42199898)
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3.

Government‒business relations in multilevel systems: the effect of conflict perception on venue choice by Marshall, David; Bernhagen, Patrick. West European Politics, September 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 5 p981-1003, 23p; Abstract: AbstractIn multilevel systems, organised interests, including business firms, can pursue their political goals at different levels. At the same time, national systems of interest representation provide important incentive structures for corporate political behaviour. In this context, corporate political strategy is guided by firms’ perceptions of their relationship with policy-makers. If this relationship is under strain in one venue, firms shift their lobbying effort to alternative venues, subject to constraints reflecting national institutional legacies. Using survey data on 56 large German and British firms, the article investigates empirically how perceptions of government‒business relations and national systems of interest representation interact to shape the political behaviour of large firms in multilevel systems. The analysis shows that perceived conflict with public authorities at the national level leads to increased business lobbying at the EU level. Furthermore, national types of interest representation shape relative business engagement at the EU level as well as the readiness of firms to shift venue.; (AN 42199896)
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4.

German MPs and interest groups in EU multilevel policy-making: the politics of information exchange by Wonka, Arndt. West European Politics, September 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 5 p1004-1024, 21p; Abstract: AbstractPolicy-makers regularly interact with interest groups to exchange information. This provides, it is often argued, the former with input needed to formulate effective policies and the latter with political influence. This article shares this broad perspective. In contrast to large parts of the literature, however, the paper argues for a political perspective on information exchanges between parliamentarians and interest groups. This perspective builds on party politicians’ ideological positions to explain the scope of parliamentarians’ information exchanges with different types of interest groups. In order to move away from the idea that information is a scarce resource for parliamentarians their interactions with interest groups are put in the context of their intra-party information exchanges. The empirical analysis of original survey data of members of the German Bundestag broadly confirms the article’s main arguments.; (AN 42199899)
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5.

Imperfect public goods and the logic of selective exit in EU interest organisations by Eising, Rainer. West European Politics, September 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 5 p1025-1045, 21p; Abstract: AbstractHow do national members react to performance failures of EU-level interest groups? Albert Hirschman suggested two responses: exit and voice. Building on this distinction, the article develops the category of selective exit which denotes members’ interest representation outside the boundaries of the EU-level interest organisation in response to performance failures. Selective exit enables members to raise voice from within and exert pressure from outside the group. The empirical test of this proposition draws on 100 interviews with national interest groups which provide evidence on the lobbying performance of EU-level groups on 20 EU directive proposals. Exact logistic regressions analyse their responses to the quality of information supply by the EU-level group and the congruence of their preferences with the EU-level group’s common position. The findings demonstrate that members join coalitions and participate in media debates to counter perceived performance failures. The conclusion summarises the findings and points out avenues for further research.; (AN 42199895)
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6.

The multilevel interest representation of national business associations by Kohler-Koch, Beate; Kotzian, Peter; Quittkat, Christine. West European Politics, September 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 5 p1046-1065, 20p; Abstract: AbstractThe role of interest groups in EU policy-making has been widely researched, but findings are still inconclusive. With regard to national business interest associations (BIAs), it is generally acknowledged that they have adopted a multilevel strategy in the course of EU integration. Yet there is little empirical knowledge as to how much attention they devote to national compared to EU institutions, how this varies between different levels of responsibility and which features of BIAs allow for access. Based on a large new dataset of BIAs from France, Germany, Poland and the United Kingdom, this article tests hypotheses derived from an exchange model of interest intermediation. The analysis shows that BIAs with high financial resources, BIAs with a high level of representativeness and multisectoral BIAs have the highest probability of access, whereas the economic importance of the represented sector has no relevance, not even for access to elected political actors, be they national or European.; (AN 42199903)
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7.

Adapting to Europe? Business interests and civil society groups in accession countries by Cekik, Aneta. West European Politics, September 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 5 p1066-1087, 22p; Abstract: AbstractWhile the Europeanisation of national interest groups is an important research agenda in the EU, very little research examines their Europeanisation outside the EU, and during the EU accession process. The article fills this gap by focusing on Europeanisation of interest groups in Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia. Using new survey data, the article looks at interest groups’ involvement in the national pre-accession process, and their activity at the EU level. The main argument of the paper stresses the absence of significant differences between the levels of Europeanisation of business and other types of interest groups (especially NGOs) in the current phase of EU accession. The regression analyses provide support to this argument, showing that access to national institutions, resources, the Europeanisation of policy areas and dependence on EU funding account for interest groups’ levels of Europeanisation, while variations across group types are not very significant.; (AN 42199905)
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8.

Networkers, fund hunters, intermediaries, or policy players? The activities of regions in Brussels by Tatham, Michaël. West European Politics, September 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 5 p1088-1108, 21p; Abstract: AbstractRegions started opening offices in Brussels in the mid-1980s. Today, well over half of Europe’s regions are present there. What do they do once they are in Brussels? Are they mainly networking, chasing funding, acting as intermediaries, monitoring legislation, or trying to influence the EU’s decision-making process? No study has analysed this question apart from the pioneering work by Marks et al.in 2002. This article breaks new ground by analysing both group-level and contextual factors in a series of multilevel models. Based on a survey of regional offices in Brussels, results indicate that contextual factors, such as levels of self-government back home, matter. However, group-level characteristics, such as an office’s longevity in Brussels, seem to affect a wider range of activities. Overall, older offices are more interested in the EU policy-making process and less interested in chasing funds or networking. Conversely, offices representing regions with weaker self-governing capacities rather conceive of their role as that of an intermediary, acting as an interface between the region and the EU institutions.; (AN 42199904)
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9.

Is the EU different? Comparing the diversity of national and EU-level systems of interest organisations by Berkhout, Joost; Hanegraaff, Marcel; Braun, Caelesta. West European Politics, September 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 5 p1109-1131, 23p; Abstract: AbstractThe European Union interest group population is often characterised as being biased towards business and detached from its constituency base. Many scholars attribute this to institutional factors unique to the EU. Yet, assessing whether or not the EU is indeed unique in this regard requires a comparative research design. We compare the EU interest group population with those in four member states: France, Great Britain, Germany and the Netherlands. We differentiate system, policy domain and organisational factors and examine their effects on interest group diversity. Our results show that the EU interest system is not more biased towards the representation of business interests than the other systems. Moreover, EU interest organisations are not more detached from their constituents than those in the studied countries. Everywhere, business interest associations seem to be better capable of representing their members’ interests than civil society groups. These findings suggest that the EU is less of a sui generissystem than commonly assumed and imply the need for more fine-grained analyses of interest group diversity.; (AN 42199906)
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10.

Cultural capital and the density of organised interests lobbying the European Parliament by Carroll, Brendan J.; Rasmussen, Anne. West European Politics, September 2017, Vol. 40 Issue: Number 5 p1132-1152, 21p; Abstract: AbstractDrawing on a new dataset the article investigates a case study of the population of interest representatives lobbying the European Parliament. It examines the role of economic and cultural resources to account for the representation of organised interests from different EU member states. It adds to the existing literature on the density of organised interests by showing that in addition to economic resources, cultural capital plays a significant role in stimulating the activity of organised interests. Whether countries have a high number of organised interests in the parliament’s interest group community depends on both whether they are economically prosperous and how large a share of their citizens participate in associational life. In addition, the findings demonstrate how the ranking of countries in the population of organised interests lobbying the parliament depends on the benchmark used to measure density.; (AN 42199910)
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14

World Policy Journal
Volume 32, no. 4, December 2015

Record

Results

1.

Latin America on Life Support? World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p1-2, 2p; (AN 37471479)
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2.

The Big Question: Fixing Roles: What Are the Challenges Determining Your Country’s Position Within Latin America? by Turzi, Mariano; Canofre, Fernanda; de la Paz Meléndez, Gabriela; Serrano, Lorena Oyarzún; Castillo, Hernán; Mendizabal, Enrique; Munyo, Ignacio; Fontana, Andrés. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p3-8, 6p; (AN 37471473)
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3.

Imagining Eden by Gurría-Quintana, Ángel. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p10-13, 4p; (AN 37471476)
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4.

Map Room: Latin Americans on the Move World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p14-15, 2p; (AN 37471480)
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5.

The Hangover: Latin America Recovers After Shot of Success by Ávila, Ricardo. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p17-22, 6p; (AN 37471483)
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6.

Anatomy: Chinese Investment in South America World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p24-25, 2p; (AN 37471471)
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7.

Goodbye, Venezuela by Reeve, Christopher. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p26-36, 11p; (AN 37471481)
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8.

The Changing Face of Cuba by Mattingly, Amanda. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p37-49, 13p; (AN 37471482)
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9.

Free Trade: A Ticket to a Bigger Party by Gurría, Ángel. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p51-56, 6p; (AN 37471470)
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10.

Nauru: A Cautionary Tale by Sokhin, Vlad. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p58-71, 14p; (AN 37471477)
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11.

The Dark Net: Policing the Internet’s Underworld by Omand, David. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p75-82, 8p; (AN 37471469)
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12.

Deadly Interactions by Yayla, Ahmet S.. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p83-91, 9p; (AN 37471475)
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13.

Open SESAME: A Powerful Light Attracts Middle Eastern Scientists by Blaustein, Richard. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p92-99, 8p; (AN 37471478)
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14.

Leadership Challenges in a Hyper-Changing World by Genovese, Michael A.. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p100-107, 8p; (AN 37471472)
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15.

Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow by Andelman, David A.. World Policy Journal, December 2015, Vol. 32 Issue: Number 4 p108-118, 11p; (AN 37471474)
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16.

Democracy by Andelman, David. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p1-2, 2p; (AN 28340185)
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17.

The Big Question: What Is The Biggest Threat To Democracy? by Kaplinski, Jaan; Kathrada, Ahmed; Raza, Raheel; Al-Nafjan, Eman; Wangyal, Lobsang; Hegyi, Gyula; Sha’er, Sawsan; Koukku-Ronde, Ritva. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p3-7, 5p; (AN 28340186)
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18.

Viva Democracy! by de Beer, Patrice. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p9-14, 6p; (AN 28340187)
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19.

The Art of Dissent: A Chat with Ai Weiwei by Andelman, David. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p15-21, 7p; (AN 28340188)
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20.

Anatomy: Autocracy Index World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p22-23, 2p; (AN 28340189)
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21.

Afghanistan: Mobilizing for Democracy by Creighton, James. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p25-36, 12p; (AN 28340190)
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22.

Map Room: Electoral Fraud in Afghanistan by Hastey, Joshua. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p28-29, 2p; (AN 28340191)
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23.

Serving Democracy, or America, Abroad? by Kinstler, Linda. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p37-47, 11p; (AN 28340193)
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24.

Ban on Democracy: A Conversation with Ban Ki-moon World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p49-55, 7p; (AN 28340192)
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25.

Water and Our World by Stirton, Brent. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p56-67, 12p; (AN 28340194)
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26.

Ivory Coast: Victor’s Justice by Corey-Boulet, Robbie. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p68-79, 12p; (AN 28340196)
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27.

Basque-ing in Peace by Matloff, Judith. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p81-88, 8p; (AN 28340195)
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28.

Argentina: Back to Peronism by Schmall, Emily. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p90-99, 10p; (AN 28340197)
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29.

Turning Porsches into Malbec by Schmall, Emily. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p97-97, 1p; (AN 28340198)
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30.

Hidden Beneath the Seas by O’Dor, Ron; Berghe, Edward. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p101-108, 8p; (AN 28340199)
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31.

… For the Sake of Change by Andelman, David. World Policy Journal, September 2012, Vol. 29 Issue: Number 3 p110-119, 10p; (AN 28340200)
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15

World Politics
Volume 69, no. 3, July 2017

Record

Results

1.

WPO volume 69 issue 3 Cover and Back matter World Politics, July 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 3 pb1-b3, 3p; (AN 42562790)
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2.

WPO volume 69 issue 3 Cover and Front matter World Politics, July 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 3 pf1-f6, 6p; (AN 42562787)
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3.

Diverging Solidarity by Ibsen, Christian Lyhne; Thelen, Kathleen. World Politics, July 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 3 p409-447, 39p; Abstract: The transition from Fordist manufacturing to the so-called knowledge economy confronts organized labor across the advanced market economies with a new and more difficult landscape. Many scholars have suggested that the future of egalitarian capitalism depends on forging new political coalitions that bridge the interests of workers in the “new” and “old” economies. This article explores current trajectories of change in Denmark and Sweden, two countries that are still seen as embodying a more egalitarian model of capitalism. The authors show that labor unions in these countries are pursuing two quite different strategies for achieving social solidarity—the Danish aimed at equality of opportunity and the Swedish aimed at equality of outcomes. The article examines the origins of these different strategic paths and explores the distinctive distributional outcomes they have produced. The conclusion draws out the broad lessons these cases hold for the choices currently confronting labor movements throughout the advanced industrial world.; (AN 42562789)
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4.

Solidaristic Unionism and Support for Redistribution in Contemporary Europe by Mosimann, Nadja; Pontusson, Jonas. World Politics, July 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 3 p448-492, 45p; Abstract: Using data from the European Social Survey (2002–14), this article explores the effect of union membership on support for redistribution. The authors hypothesize that the wage-bargaining practices of unions promote egalitarian distributive norms, which lead union members to support redistribution, and that this effect is strongest among high-wage workers. Consistent with the authors’ expectations, the empirical analysis shows that the solidarity effect of union membership is strongest when unions encompass a very large share of the labor force or primarily organize low-wage workers. The authors also show that low-wage workers have become a significantly less important union constituency in many European countries over the time period covered by the analysis.; (AN 42562793)
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5.

Political Competition and the Initiation of International Conflict by Goldsmith, Benjamin E.; Semenovich, Dimitri; Sowmya, Arcot; Grgic, Gorana. World Politics, July 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 3 p493-531, 39p; Abstract: Although some scholars claim that the empirical evidence for the very low instance of interstate war between democracies is well established, others have raised new challenges. But even if democratic peace is observed, its theoretical explanation remains unresolved. Consensus has not emerged among competing approaches, some of which are criticized for offering monadic logic for a dyadic phenomenon. This article synthesizes recent literature to advance a simple, but distinct, explicitly dyadic theory about institutionalized political competition, leading to expectations that it is the most important source of democratic peace. While the authors are far from the first to consider political competition, their approach stands out in according it the central role in a dyadic theory focused on the regime type of initiators and target states. They argue that potential vulnerability to opposition criticism on target-regime-specific normative and costs-of-war bases is more fundamental than mechanisms such as audience costs, informational effects, or public goods logic. Incumbents in high-competition states will be reluctant to initiate conflict with a democracy due to anticipated inability to defend the conflict as right, necessary, and winnable. The authors present new and highly robust evidence that democratic peace is neither spurious nor a methodological artifact, and that it can be attributed to high-competition states’ aversion to initiating fights with democracies.; (AN 42562792)
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6.

Humiliation and Third-Party Aggression by Barnhart, Joslyn. World Politics, July 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 3 p532-568, 37p; Abstract: There is a growing consensus that status concerns drive state behavior. Although recent attention has been paid to when states are most likely to act on behalf of status concerns, very little is known about which actions states are most likely to engage in when their status is threatened. This article focuses on the effect of publicly humiliating international events as sources of status threat. Such events call into question a state's image in the eyes of others, thereby increasing the likelihood that the state will engage in reassertions of its status. The article presents a theory of status reassertion that outlines which states will be most likely to respond, as well as when and how they will be most likely to do so. The author argues that because high-status states have the most to lose from repeated humiliation, they will be relatively risk averse when reasserting their status. In contrast to prior work arguing that humiliation drives a need for revenge, the author demonstrates that great powers only rarely engage in direct revenge. Rather, they pursue the less risky option of projecting power abroad against weaker states to convey their intentions of remaining a great power. The validity of this theory is tested using an expanded and recoded data set of territorial change from 1816 to 2000. Great powers that have experienced a humiliating, involuntary territorial loss are more likely to attempt aggressive territorial gains in the future and, in particular, against third-party states.; (AN 42562794)
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7.

Social Forces and Regime Change by Clarke, Killian. World Politics, July 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 3 p569-602, 34p; Abstract: This article discusses three recent books that analyze patterns of political conflict and regime change in postcolonial Asia and Africa using a social forces approach to political analysis. The social forces tradition, originally pioneered by Barrington Moore, studies the social origins and political consequences of struggles between social groups whose members hold shared identities and interests. The works under review examine, respectively, the varied regime trajectories of Southeast Asia's states, divergent regime outcomes in India and Pakistan, and the institutional origins of social cleavages and political conflict in sub-Saharan Africa. Although historically the social forces paradigm has focused on conflict between class actors, the author argues that these three works fruitfully extend the social forces approach to encompass struggles between nonclass social groups, including those defined along the lines of ethnicity, religion, nationality, region, and family. This pluralized version of the social forces approach is better suited to studying patterns of regime change in Asia and Africa, where the paradigm has been less frequently applied than it has been to cases in Europe and Latin America.; (AN 42562788)
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8.

Landowners and Democracy: The Social Origins of Democracy Reconsidered—Erratum World Politics, July 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 3 p603-603, 1p; (AN 42562791)
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9.

The Contributors World Politics, March 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 2 pii-ii, 1p; (AN 41719545)
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10.

Landowners and Democracy: The Social Origins of Democracy Reconsidered by Albertus, Michael. World Politics, March 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 2 p233-276, 44p; Abstract: Abstract:Are large landowners, especially those engaged in labor-dependent agriculture, detrimental to democratization and the subsequent survival of democracy? This assumption is at the heart of both canonical and recent influential work on regime transition and durability. Using an original panel data set on the extent of labor-dependent agriculture in countries across the world since 1930, the author finds that labor-dependent agriculture was indeed historically bad for democratic stability and stunted the extension of suffrage, parliamentary independence, and free and fair elections. However, the negative influence of labor-dependent agriculture on democracy started to turn positive around the time of democracy’s third wave. The dual threats of land reform and costly domestic insurgencies in that period—often with more potent consequences under dictators—plausibly prompted landowners to push for democracy with strong horizontal constraints and favorable institutions that could protect their property more reliably over the long term than could dictatorship. The shift in support for democracy by labor-dependent landowners is a major untold story of democracy’s third wave and helps explain the persistent democratic deficit in many new democracies.; (AN 41719279)
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11.

Patronage, Trust, and State Capacity: The Historical Trajectories of Clientelism by Bustikova, Lenka; Corduneanu-Huci, Cristina. World Politics, March 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 2 p277-326, 50p; Abstract: Abstract:What explains different levels of clientelism across countries? Why do some politicians deliver clientelistic goods to their electoral constituencies, and why do some voters demand them? This article focuses on the historical origins of trust in states and shows that they have a lasting impact on contemporary patterns of patronage. The shift to programmatic politics reflects a historical transition from personalized trust in politicians to trust in impersonal bureaucracies tasked by political parties to implement policy. Past experience with public bureaucracy informs the expectations of voters and parties regarding the performance of the state and its ability to provide public goods, which in turn shape the degree of clientelistic exchange across societies. To capture state capacity, the authors focus on the critical juncture before the expansion of women’s suffrage, and use the ability of public bureaucracies to reduce infant mortality in the interwar period as a proxy for historical state capacity and as an instrument to predict trust. Macrodata from eightyeight electoral democracies and microdata from the most recent wave of the World Value Survey provide supportive evidence for the theory.; (AN 41719317)
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12.

Race, Resources, and Representation: Evidence from Brazilian Politicians by Bueno, Natália S.; Dunning, Thad. World Politics, March 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 2 p327-365, 39p; Abstract: Abstract:What explains the persistence of racial or ethnic inequalities in descriptive representation in the absence of strongly politicized racial or ethnic cleavages? This article uses new data to demonstrate a substantial racial gap between voters and politicians in Brazil. The authors show that this disparity is not plausibly due to racial preferences in the electorate as a whole, for instance, deference toward white candidates or discrimination against nonwhites, and that barriers to candidate entry or discrimination by party leaders do not likely explain the gap. Instead, they document persistent resource disparities between white and nonwhite candidates, including large differences in personal assets and campaign contributions. The findings suggest that elite closure—investments by racial and economic elites on behalf of elite candidates—help perpetuate a white political class, even in the absence of racialized politics. By underscoring this avenue through which representational disparities persist, the article contributes to research on elite power in democratic settings.; (AN 41718961)
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13.

Paying for War and Building States: The Coalitional Politics of Debt Servicing and Tax Institutions by Saylor, Ryan; Wheeler, Nicholas C.. World Politics, March 2017, Vol. 69 Issue: Number 2 p366-408, 43p; Abstract: Abstract:Many scholars believe that intense warfare propelled state formation in early modern Europe because rulers built tax institutions to pay for wars. Scholars likewise cite milder geopolitical pressures to explain the lackluster state building in the developing world. The authors analyze episodes of ferocious warfare in and beyond Europe and find that despite similar fiscal strains, not all governments built strong tax institutions to service wartime debt. When net creditors in a country’s credit market were part of the ruling political coalition, they pressed governments to diversify taxes and strengthen fiscal institutions to ensure debt service. But when net debtors held political sway, governments were indifferent to debt servicing and fiscal invigoration. Coalitional politics can help to explain why mounting debt-service obligations led to fiscal institution building in some cases, but not others. The analysis highlights how the private economic interests of ruling coalition members can affect state building.; (AN 41719275)
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